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22 April 2016

DIW Applied Micro Seminar Reference pricing with endogenous generic entry

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Speaker
  • Chiara Canta, Norwegian School of Economics

  • Inviter
    Time
    13:15-14:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 165
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 264
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 246
    20 April 2016

    Cluster-Seminar Public Finances and Living Conditions Capturing actual work hours and preferred work hours in Germany

    The estimation of over- and underemployment in Germany is normally based on data of Mikrozensus (Ehing 2014: 4) or of the Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP). However, the results differ and may lead to different political conclusions. A recent publication of the Statistisches Bundesamt (Rengers 2015), which is based on the Mikrozensus 2014, points out that for 9.3 percent of the overall labour force actual work hours and preferred work hours differ. A majority of them would prefer to increase their actual work hours. Contrary to that, estimations based on SOEP 2012 (Holst/Wieber 2014) show that 71 percent of all employees face a mismatch between actual and preferred work hours with a majority preferring a reduction of their work hours.

    Speaker
  • Julia Bringmann, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

  • Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 268
    6 April 2016

    Cluster-Seminar Public Finances and Living Conditions What drives ethnic de-segregation: selective mobility of immigrants out of co-ethnic neighbourhoods

    The value of segregated neighbourhoods in the process of integration is highly debated with often ideologically charged arguments. This study investigates the effect of socio-economic and cultural assimilation on selective mobility of immigrants. For that, detailed neighbourhood and housing market information are linked to representative household panel data for Germany. The data allows distinguishing the ethnic composition of households and their neighbours. This enables a fine-grained assessment on the relation between co-ethnicity and mobility while controlling for regional supply and demand of housing. As a result, higher income and being a second-generation immigrant are associated with moving out (vs. moving among) co-ethnic neighbourhoods. Other indicators of cultural assimilation such as German language proficiency, holding a German passport and affiliation to one’s home country show no significant effect. Feeling generally disadvantaged due to origin has also little explanatory power for the residential behaviour of immigrants. However, experienced discrimination in the housing is particularly apparent among out movers. The results are in line with the spatial assimilation model but emphasize structural and not cultural terms that drive moving out of co-ethnic neighbourhoods. The popular accusation of ethnic self-segregation should therefore be revisited and contrasted with barriers for residential and social mobility among immigrants.

    Speaker
    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 268
    16 March 2016

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar Personality and Marriage: Selection or Causal Effects?

    Personality traits (also called noncognitive skills) are an important predictor for many economic outcomes and indicators of wellbeing, such as labor force participation, income, and health. While it is well established that personality changes during childhood and can be influenced by interventions, much less is known about whether personality is malleable during young adulthood. This is because of the difficulty of separating correlation and causal effects for a period of life where there are few controlled or natural experiments available.

    In this research, we empirically investigate whether marriage during young adulthood affects personality. To separate selection into marriage by personality from a causal effect of marriage in young adulthood on personality, we use as identification strategy the sharp decrease in marriage rates in East Germany induced by the German reunification.

    Speaker
  • Kristin Kleinjans (California State University)

  • Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 223
    9 March 2016

    Cluster-Seminar Public Finances and Living Conditions Full or partial retirement? A dynamic discrete choice analysis

    We consider forward looking older workers deciding between immediate retirement and working full-time or part-time until a given retirement age. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of modelling the part-time work decision in the option value and the dynamic programming models.

    Speaker
  • Tunga Kantarci (Tilburg University, The Netherlands)

  • Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 264
    2 March 2016

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar Political Socialization after Parental Separation: Breaking with the Traditional Family Model

    The increase in divorce rates over the past decades challenges the traditional image of the two-parent family. Yet, this traditional view of the family remains most often central to political socialization research. Therefore, this study investigates how parental separation affects the political socialization process, by comparing adults who did and did not experience parental separation while living at home. I firstly expect that parental separation yields more left-wing ideologies and more favourable attitudes towards redistribution, because of the economic deprivation that is often caused by parental separation. Secondly, I expect more liberal attitudes towards sexual and family ethics among adult children of whom the parents have separated during their childhood, because of the experience of parents breaking with traditional family norms. As a first step, pan-European multilevel analyses are performed using the European Values Study to investigate to what extent the political preferences and attitudes towards sexual and family ethics of adult children with divorced parents differ, from those without separated parents. Secondly, household data from Germany (G-SOEP) is used, that allows to control for parental preferences, and to estimate sibling fixed effect models in which the effect of divorce on political attitudes is investigated, by comparing siblings from the same family with differential experiences regarding their parental separation.

    Speaker
  • Mathilde M. van Ditmars (European University Institute)

  • Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 223
    17 February 2016

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar Dynastic Inequality and Persistence of Human Capital Over Three Generations

    Empirical research on the persistence of inequality has been largely restricted to a two generational framework, mainly due to a lack of appropriate data on multiple generations. At the same time, it is often assumed that the intergenerational persistence of socio-economic outcomes follows a first-order Markov process; i.e. the influence of ancestors vanishes within few generations. However, an increasing number of studies show that this assumption should be revisited. This study aims to quantify the extend of persistence of human capital over three generations, comparing the US and Germany. Hereby, we make use of the rich informational content of nationally representative household survey data; the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) and the Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP). Applying different measures, we evaluate the persistence of human capital over a span of over 120 years. Our results highlight a relatively high persistence of human capital over three generations in both countries, while intergenerational mobility is slightly lower in Germany than in the US. Finally, we cannot reject the hypothesis that the grandparental coefficient is higher than the one obtained by an iterated regression procedure assuming an AR(1) process, shedding light on the long-run aspects of equality of opportunity within the two societies.
    (joint with Maximilian Stockhausen, FU Berlin)

    Speaker
  • Guido Neidhöfer (FU Berlin)

  • Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 223
    12 February 2016

    DIW Applied Micro Seminar Consumer Search Costs and Preferences on the Internet

    More Information
    Speaker
  • Gregory Jolivet, University of Bristol

  • Inviter
    Time
    13:15-14:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 165
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 264
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 246
    10 February 2016

    Cluster-Seminar Public Finances and Living Conditions Full or partial retirement? Effects of the pension incentives and increasing retirement age in the Netherlands and the United States

    The share of the older workers in the labor force has increased due to population aging and pension reforms in many countries. However, rules of the public and private pension schemes and restrictions from the employers still require large populations of older workers with possibly heterogeneous work preferences to retire fully at a given age. We study the preferences of older people for a rich set of retirement trajectories characterized by early or delayed full retirement as well as partial retirement at various ages in the Netherlands and the United States. Two in five prefer partial retirement over early or delayed abrupt full retirement. This suggests that partial retirement can substantially increase the utility derived from work in old age. Furthermore, we study the effects of the pension incentives and increasing retirement age on the preferences to delay retirement fully or partially as means of reducing public expenditure. Individuals want to use partial retirement to extend their work lives if deferring pension rights are made actuarially attractive or if pension accruals are made less generous. On the other hand, as the retirement age increases, individuals want to retire early or work part-time instead of full-time. The comparison of the results between the Netherlands and the United States shows that while people in the Netherlands are responsive to a substitution effect of higher pensions, people in the United States are responsive to an income effect of higher pensions.

    Speaker
  • Tunga Kantarci (Tilburg University, The Netherlands)

  • Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 264
    27 January 2016

    Cluster-Seminar Public Finances and Living Conditions Career Breaks of Mothers and the Role of Time Discounting

    Speaker
    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 264
    20 January 2016

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar The Determinants of Natives’ Intergroup Relationships with Migrants - An Analysis using SOEP-data

     Private intergroup relationships between natives and migrants, such as friendships and companionships, are traditionally treated as important indicator of migrant integration. In addition, they are discussed as a facilitating factor in migrants’ search for high-quality work, as a way to diminish mutual prejudice and to break stereotypes and finally as opportunity for natives to acquire skills to deal with challenges beyond the borders of their home-country. In my analysis, I try to identify personal characteristics and environmental factors that influence German natives’ personal relationships with persons of non-German origin. Ego-centered network research on intergroup relationships has so far neglected the native part of such relationships in favor of the non-native side. Information on over 18,000 German natives’ visiting contacts at home were collected by the Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP) between 2007 and 2015 in five waves and thereby enable longitudinal analyses that focus on intra-personal changes. Exploiting SOEP-survey-data enriched with small-scale neighborhood information, a wide range of possible determinants, including occupational status, neighborhood composition and attitudes towards migration are researched.

    Speaker
    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 223
    13 January 2016

    Cluster-Seminar Public Finances and Living Conditions Labor Market Frictions and Retirement Timing in Germany – A Structural Model and Subsequent Ex-Ante Policy Evaluation

    Losing a job after age 60 in Germany is virtually equivalent to the end of one’s working life. Roughly 25% of job exits after age 60 are involuntary with considerable variation along region, age, tenure and education. Considering this, I estimate a structural model of retirement timing in the presence of labor market frictions. A subsequent ex-ante policy analysis is meant to illustrate the likely consequences of shifting the regular retirement age to 67 (“Rente mit 67”) in terms of average retirement age. Scenarios without frictions provide an upper bound for the reaction potential of the work force and likely to overestimate the true effect.

    Speaker
    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 264
    8 January 2016

    DIW Applied Micro Seminar Regulating innovative industries – the case of telecom in Austria

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    Speaker
  • Johannes Koenen, CESifo

  • Inviter
    Time
    13:15-14:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 165
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 264
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 246
    6 January 2016

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar Parental socioeconomic status and the quality of early childhood education and care: Evidence from Germany

    (joint with Pia S. Schober and C. Katharina Spieß)
    In Germany, large heterogeneity exists with respect to the quality of early childhood education and care (ECEC) institutions. We examine whether children from socioeconomically advantaged families face more favorable conditions when starting their educational career by attending ECEC centers of better quality compared to more disadvantaged children. We exploit a new dataset combining the SOEP (wave 2013) with information from the K²ID-SOEP extension study on the ECEC facilities attended by respondents’ offspring. Our final sample consists of 764 children attending 700 day-care groups in 646 centers across Germany. We test if maternal employment status, parental education, children’s migration background and family income are systematically linked to a wide range of indicators capturing aspects of structural, orientation and process quality. Our results point to significant associations of some indicators mainly with work status and parental education, disadvantaging children of the least educated women and women working part-time or less. We find these relationships primarily for quality indicators that are easy to observe or enquire about for parents.

    Speaker
    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 223
    16 Dec 2015

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar Beyond Filial Piety: The Structural and Cultural Determinants of Intergenerational Contact in China

    This is the first representative study to assess the main determinants of intergenerational contact in China. It used a representative sample of 15,399 child-parent dyads to predict the frequency of (a) face-to-face contacts (b) contacts by (mobile) phone, text messaging and other electronic means and (c) all contacts; focusing in particular on the role of migration as well as children's gender, marital status and education level. The findings showed that distance was a major barrier to face-to-face contact in China, although most migrant children called regularly. They also indicated higher overall levels of contact with sons than with daughters, which can be attributed to the traditional norm of filial piety. At the same time, it was found that unmarried daughters and highly educated daughters had more contact with parents than their male counterparts, which suggests a weakening of gendered family practices in the wake of China's demographic and economic transformation.

    Speaker
  • Rob Gruijters (BGSS)

  • Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 223
    11 Dec 2015

    DIW Applied Micro Seminar Risk-sharing and family labor supply

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    Speaker
  • Andreas Steinhauer, University of Edinburgh

  • Inviter
    Time
    13:15-14:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 165
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 264
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 246
    9 Dec 2015

    Cluster-Seminar Public Finances and Living Conditions Labor supply and the pension system - Evidence from a Regression Kink Design

    This paper uses a Regression Kink Design to estimate the labor supply effects of changes in the financial incentives for early retirement. In particular we examine the effect of the gradual introduction of pension deductions for early retirement according to the 1992 German pension reform on the actual retirement age of women eligible for women old-age pensions. This reform allows to exploit exogenous variation in  benefits using kinks in the schedule of pension benefits depending on the birth cohort. For the empirical analysis we use high-quality administrative data from the German Federal Pension Insurance (VSKT) and find positive and significant effects of the reform on the actual retirement age.

    Speaker
    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 264
    27 Nov 2015

    DIW Applied Micro Seminar Achievement Gap Estimates and Deviations from Cardinal Comparability

    More Information
    Speaker
  • Eric R. Nielsen, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System

  • Inviter
    Time
    13:15-14:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 165
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 264
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 246
    25 Nov 2015

    Cluster-Seminar Public Finances and Living Conditions Family structure and educational attainment in East and West Germany during the 20th century – a sibling analysis

    This study investigates whether the link between family dissolution and children’s educational attainment is contingent on the broader social and institutional context. The comparison of former capitalist West Germany and socialist East Germany presents an excellent case study as these countries differed considerably with regard to ideology and policies regarding families, schooling and labour markets. We base our analyses on the data of the German Life History Study that covers cohorts born throughout the twentieth century. Results of sibling fixed effect analyses show that growing up in a dissolved family in the former West was detrimental for educational attainment. In contrast, in the East with its comprehensive schooling system and extensive support for families and working mothers, family dissolution was not related to educational outcomes. The effects of family dissolution may thus be reinforced in stratified systems and possibly softened by social policies equalizing the social and economic situation attributed to dissolved families.

    Speaker
  • Wiebke Schulz, University of Bielefeld

  • Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 264
    18 Nov 2015

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar Why has Income Inequality in Germany Increased from 2002 to 2011?

    To assess the impact of changes the tax and transfer system (tax reductions and a controversial overhaul of the transfer system) and in wage rates on income inequality in Germany from 2002 to 2011, I simulate counterfactual income distributions and calculate marginal effects. Applying behavioral microsimulation and wage regressions to data from the Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP), I estimate marginal contributions including behavioral responses. The simulations show that tax and transfer reforms have had an inequality reducing effect. Depending on the order of the decomposition, changes in labor market prices are shown to have led to either an overall decrease in income inequality or to have had a negligible effect. Thus, the increase in inequality was mainly due to other factors. Graphical representations of the counterfactual distributions are provided.

    Speaker
  • Robin Jessen (Freie Universität Berlin)

  • Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 223
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