photofantastica (Copyright)  Mutter Eltern Elternteil
Press Release, 22 Mar 2017

People across Germany are happier today than at any other point since German reunification According to a new analysis of data from the nationally representative, long-term Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) study, people in both West and East Germany have been happier on average since 2015 than at any ... more

Gerd Wolpert (Copyright)  Lupe Vergrößerungsglas Vergrößerungsgläser
Economic Bulletin, 20 Mar 2017

The world economy continues on its upward growth path, with global production expected to grow by 3.7 percent this year and slightly more than that in 2018. The economies in both the developed and the emerging countries are gaining momentum. Solid output growth is expected for the U.S. and euro area ... more

marcus (Copyright)  Balkendiagramm Säulendiagramm Diagramm
Economic Bulletin, 20 Mar 2017

The German economy's upward growth trend continues, with the economic output expected to increase by 1.4 percent this year with slightly overloaded capacities. Employment growth remains strong with the creation of 600,000 new jobs, which has in turn led to an increase in private consumption – ... more

martini (Copyright)  Geldschein Geldscheine Papiergeld
Interview, 20 Mar 2017

Mr. Fichtner, will the German economy be able to maintain 2016’s growth momentum over the course of the current year? Although Germany’s economic growth will be a bit lower in 2017, this is primarily due to the fact that there are fewer workdays this year than there were last year ... more

maranso (Copyright)  Weißes Haus Farbbild
In the media, 17 Mar 2017

The op-ed by Marcel Fratzscher was first published on foreignpolicy.com on March 16, 2017. If Trump wants a Europe that takes care of its own needs, he needs a strong partner in Berlin. Donald Trump’s relationship with Angela Merkel has gotten off to a rocky start. Trump has, effectively, ... more

List of news
by Ferdinand Fichtner, Marcel Fratzscher, Guido Baldi, Karl Brenke, Marius Clemens, Christian Dreger, Hella Engerer, Stefan Gebauer, Michael Hachula, Simon Junker, Robert Lange, Claus Michelsen, Malte Rieth, Thore Schlaak, Kristina van Deuverden, in DIW Economic Bulletin

by Ferdinand Fichtner, Guido Baldi, Christian Dreger, Hella Engerer, Stefan Gebauer, Michael Hachula, Robert Lange, Malte Rieth, in DIW Economic Bulletin

The world economy continues on its upward growth path, with global production expected to grow by 3.7 percent this year and slightly more than that in 2018. The economies in both the developed and the emerging countries are gaining momentum. Solid output growth is expected for the U.S. and euro area over the forecast period; China’s growth rates remain high, though they are declining somewhat; and Russia is coming out of its recession. Private consumption is driving growth in the developed countries, but the rise in inflation – which is due to higher energy prices – is expected to slow down consumption growth a bit. The global increase in prices is likely to also lead to a slightly more restrictive monetary policy overall. A number of economic policy-related risks – not least among them, the protectionism – could have a negative impact on the world economy, in particular on investment activity.

by Ferdinand Fichtner, Karl Brenke, Marius Clemens, Simon Junker, Claus Michelsen, Thore Schlaak, Kristina van Deuverden, in DIW Economic Bulletin

The German economy's upward growth trend continues, with the economic output expected to increase by 1.4 percent this year with slightly overloaded capacities. Employment growth remains strong with the creation of 600,000 new jobs, which has in turn led to an increase in private consumption – one of the key growth drivers of the German economy. The higher inflation rates are dampening purchasing power, but they will subside later on in the forecast period. The high public budget surpluses will experience a sharp decline. Investment, on the other hand, remains weak, partially due to the fact that Brexit and Trump are creating uncertainty for German exporters. Frictions in the financial markets that may arise as a result of the upcoming elections – in France and the Netherlands, for example – could present risks for the real economy.

List of Publications

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DIW : World real expected to grow by 3.7% (2017) & slightly more in 2018 (3,8%)
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