Veranstaltungen

Demographie und Bevölkerung
1 2 3 4
1. Juni 2016

Cluster-Seminar Öffentliche Finanzen und Lebenslagen The effect of compressing secondary schooling on higher education decisions

The sustainability of social security systems in many European countries is at risk due to population aging. Many suggestions to increase the share of working-age individuals deal with raising the age for full pension eligibility. A fundamental education reform in Germany extends the working life from the other side: A major education reform in Germany reduced the length of the academic high school track from 9 to 8 years, while leaving the number of overall instruction hours unchanged. Accordingly, the fixed number of instruction hours was distributed over fewer years of schooling, such that learning intensity and weekly workload increased. We investigate the consequences of this so-called G8 reform on students’ higher education decisions. Based on a difference-in-differences approach using high-quality, administrative data on all students in Germany, we find that the G8 reform not only resulted in delayed university enrollment, but also decreased general enrollment rates. Moreover, students' study progress in higher education is negatively affected.
Our results imply that the G8 reform leads to a reduction in human capital and that the main goal of reducing age at labor market entry may not be fully achieved. 

Referent/-in
Zeit
12:30 - 13:30
Ort
DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
Ansprechpartner/-in
im DIW Berlin
Tel.: +49 30 89789 268
26. Mai 2016

SOEP Brown Bag Seminar Special: Evaluating patterns of income growth when status matters: a robust approach

Flaviana Palmisano is a lecturer at the University of Rome LUMSA. Before, she was FNR-Marie Curie fellow at the University of Luxembourg (2014-2016). She holds a PhD in Economics of the University of Bari (2008-2011). Her research interests are in the field of distributional analysis, with a focus on the measurement of the dynamics of poverty, inequality, income mobility and equality of opportunity.

The presentation might be of interest for anyone who intends to work with the harmonized panel data from the Cross National Equivalent File (CNEF) which includes eight country-specific surveys: the British Household Panel Study (BHPS), the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA), the Korea Labor and Income Panel Study (KLIPS), the Swiss Household Panel (SHP), the Canadian Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID), the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP), the Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey, and the U.S. Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID). Charlotte Bartels is your contact person at the DIW for all things concerning CNEF (such as data access).

Referent/-in
  • Flaviana Palmisano (University of Rome)

  • Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 223
    25. Mai 2016

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar Gifts and Inheritances: How do They Shape the Wealth Distribution

    Using Data from the Socio-Economic Panel, I estimate the impact of intergenerational transfers on the level and the inequality of wealth. I particularly focus on the propensity of households to save from gifts and inheritances: While many studies on wealth inequality assume that these transfers are fully saved, households typically add only a certain share of them to their previously accumulated wealth. I find that households on average save only around 60 Cents of an inherited Euro. Quantile regression estimates then reveal that the propensity to save increases almost monotonically over the wealth distribution. Using the fitted values, I simulate the wealth distribution with and without transfers. I however do not find evidence that the heterogeneity in the propensity to save translates in a disequalizing effect of intergenerational transfers on the wealth distribution.

    Referent/-in
  • Marten von Werder (Freie Universität Berlin)

  • Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 223
    4. Mai 2016

    Cluster-Seminar Öffentliche Finanzen und Lebenslagen Income and the Utilization of Long-Term Care: Evidence from Short-Term Income Shocks

    Ex post moral hazard poses a concern to private insurers and to policymakers considering the expansion of publicly subsidized health insurance.  This is especially true of private long-term care insurance markets in the United States, which are small and have been contracting in recent years.  A significant publicly administered option was passed as part of the Affordable Care Act but then repealed.  Long-term care thus constitutes the largest out-of-pocket health care expense facing the elderly in the United States today.  In formulating policy to mitigate this risk, it is important to distinguish moral hazard arising from price effects, which may be considered socially inefficient spending, from moral hazard arising from income effects, which may represent a socially efficient increase in access to care.  Little evidence exists, however, on the effects of income on utilization of long-term care services.  In this paper, we examine the purchase of long-term care services following plausibly exogenous positive shocks to income.  We find that positive income shocks lead to a greater probability of purchase of home-based long-term care but not of nursing home care.
    (joint with Daifeng He, Jing Dong and John Nyman)

    Referent/-in
  • R. Tamara Konetzka (University of Chicago)

  • Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 268
    27. April 2016

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar The Impact of Private and Public Childcare Provision on the Distribution of Children's Incomes in Germany

    This paper investigates the impact of extending disposable cash income of children by the monetary value of private and public childcare provision on economic inequality in Germany between 2009 and 2012. It takes account of the multidimensionality of children's well-being and access to economic resources. Combining survey data from the Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) and Familien in Deutschland (FiD) with administrative data from the German Federal Statistical Office, extended income inequality is found to be significantly lower than cash income inequality across all years. In addition, extended income inequality tends to decrease over time, whereas cash income inequality slightly increases. This difference is due to the expansion of public childcare provision, which profits children living with single parents most, and gives additional evidence for its equalizing potential as a policy instrument.

    Referent/-in
  • Maximilian Stockhausen (Freie Universität Berlin)

  • Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 223
    20. April 2016

    Cluster-Seminar Öffentliche Finanzen und Lebenslagen Capturing actual work hours and preferred work hours in Germany

    The estimation of over- and underemployment in Germany is normally based on data of Mikrozensus (Ehing 2014: 4) or of the Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP). However, the results differ and may lead to different political conclusions. A recent publication of the Statistisches Bundesamt (Rengers 2015), which is based on the Mikrozensus 2014, points out that for 9.3 percent of the overall labour force actual work hours and preferred work hours differ. A majority of them would prefer to increase their actual work hours. Contrary to that, estimations based on SOEP 2012 (Holst/Wieber 2014) show that 71 percent of all employees face a mismatch between actual and preferred work hours with a majority preferring a reduction of their work hours.

    Referent/-in
  • Julia Bringmann, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

  • Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 268
    6. April 2016

    Cluster-Seminar Öffentliche Finanzen und Lebenslagen What drives ethnic de-segregation: selective mobility of immigrants out of co-ethnic neighbourhoods

    The value of segregated neighbourhoods in the process of integration is highly debated with often ideologically charged arguments. This study investigates the effect of socio-economic and cultural assimilation on selective mobility of immigrants. For that, detailed neighbourhood and housing market information are linked to representative household panel data for Germany. The data allows distinguishing the ethnic composition of households and their neighbours. This enables a fine-grained assessment on the relation between co-ethnicity and mobility while controlling for regional supply and demand of housing. As a result, higher income and being a second-generation immigrant are associated with moving out (vs. moving among) co-ethnic neighbourhoods. Other indicators of cultural assimilation such as German language proficiency, holding a German passport and affiliation to one’s home country show no significant effect. Feeling generally disadvantaged due to origin has also little explanatory power for the residential behaviour of immigrants. However, experienced discrimination in the housing is particularly apparent among out movers. The results are in line with the spatial assimilation model but emphasize structural and not cultural terms that drive moving out of co-ethnic neighbourhoods. The popular accusation of ethnic self-segregation should therefore be revisited and contrasted with barriers for residential and social mobility among immigrants.

    Referent/-in
    Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 268
    16. März 2016

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar Personality and Marriage: Selection or Causal Effects?

    Personality traits (also called noncognitive skills) are an important predictor for many economic outcomes and indicators of wellbeing, such as labor force participation, income, and health. While it is well established that personality changes during childhood and can be influenced by interventions, much less is known about whether personality is malleable during young adulthood. This is because of the difficulty of separating correlation and causal effects for a period of life where there are few controlled or natural experiments available.

    In this research, we empirically investigate whether marriage during young adulthood affects personality. To separate selection into marriage by personality from a causal effect of marriage in young adulthood on personality, we use as identification strategy the sharp decrease in marriage rates in East Germany induced by the German reunification.

    Referent/-in
  • Kristin Kleinjans (California State University)

  • Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 223
    9. März 2016

    Cluster-Seminar Öffentliche Finanzen und Lebenslagen Full or partial retirement? A dynamic discrete choice analysis

    We consider forward looking older workers deciding between immediate retirement and working full-time or part-time until a given retirement age. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of modelling the part-time work decision in the option value and the dynamic programming models.

    Referent/-in
  • Tunga Kantarci (Tilburg University, The Netherlands)

  • Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 264
    2. März 2016

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar Political Socialization after Parental Separation: Breaking with the Traditional Family Model

    The increase in divorce rates over the past decades challenges the traditional image of the two-parent family. Yet, this traditional view of the family remains most often central to political socialization research. Therefore, this study investigates how parental separation affects the political socialization process, by comparing adults who did and did not experience parental separation while living at home. I firstly expect that parental separation yields more left-wing ideologies and more favourable attitudes towards redistribution, because of the economic deprivation that is often caused by parental separation. Secondly, I expect more liberal attitudes towards sexual and family ethics among adult children of whom the parents have separated during their childhood, because of the experience of parents breaking with traditional family norms. As a first step, pan-European multilevel analyses are performed using the European Values Study to investigate to what extent the political preferences and attitudes towards sexual and family ethics of adult children with divorced parents differ, from those without separated parents. Secondly, household data from Germany (G-SOEP) is used, that allows to control for parental preferences, and to estimate sibling fixed effect models in which the effect of divorce on political attitudes is investigated, by comparing siblings from the same family with differential experiences regarding their parental separation.

    Referent/-in
  • Mathilde M. van Ditmars (European University Institute)

  • Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 223
    17. Februar 2016

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar Dynastic Inequality and Persistence of Human Capital Over Three Generations

    Empirical research on the persistence of inequality has been largely restricted to a two generational framework, mainly due to a lack of appropriate data on multiple generations. At the same time, it is often assumed that the intergenerational persistence of socio-economic outcomes follows a first-order Markov process; i.e. the influence of ancestors vanishes within few generations. However, an increasing number of studies show that this assumption should be revisited. This study aims to quantify the extend of persistence of human capital over three generations, comparing the US and Germany. Hereby, we make use of the rich informational content of nationally representative household survey data; the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) and the Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP). Applying different measures, we evaluate the persistence of human capital over a span of over 120 years. Our results highlight a relatively high persistence of human capital over three generations in both countries, while intergenerational mobility is slightly lower in Germany than in the US. Finally, we cannot reject the hypothesis that the grandparental coefficient is higher than the one obtained by an iterated regression procedure assuming an AR(1) process, shedding light on the long-run aspects of equality of opportunity within the two societies.
    (joint with Maximilian Stockhausen, FU Berlin)

    Referent/-in
  • Guido Neidhöfer (FU Berlin)

  • Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 223
    10. Februar 2016

    Cluster-Seminar Öffentliche Finanzen und Lebenslagen Full or partial retirement? Effects of the pension incentives and increasing retirement age in the Netherlands and the United States

    The share of the older workers in the labor force has increased due to population aging and pension reforms in many countries. However, rules of the public and private pension schemes and restrictions from the employers still require large populations of older workers with possibly heterogeneous work preferences to retire fully at a given age. We study the preferences of older people for a rich set of retirement trajectories characterized by early or delayed full retirement as well as partial retirement at various ages in the Netherlands and the United States. Two in five prefer partial retirement over early or delayed abrupt full retirement. This suggests that partial retirement can substantially increase the utility derived from work in old age. Furthermore, we study the effects of the pension incentives and increasing retirement age on the preferences to delay retirement fully or partially as means of reducing public expenditure. Individuals want to use partial retirement to extend their work lives if deferring pension rights are made actuarially attractive or if pension accruals are made less generous. On the other hand, as the retirement age increases, individuals want to retire early or work part-time instead of full-time. The comparison of the results between the Netherlands and the United States shows that while people in the Netherlands are responsive to a substitution effect of higher pensions, people in the United States are responsive to an income effect of higher pensions.

    Referent/-in
  • Tunga Kantarci (Tilburg University, The Netherlands)

  • Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 264
    27. Januar 2016

    Cluster-Seminar Öffentliche Finanzen und Lebenslagen Career Breaks of Mothers and the Role of Time Discounting

    Referent/-in
    Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 264
    20. Januar 2016

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar The Determinants of Natives’ Intergroup Relationships with Migrants - An Analysis using SOEP-data

     Private intergroup relationships between natives and migrants, such as friendships and companionships, are traditionally treated as important indicator of migrant integration. In addition, they are discussed as a facilitating factor in migrants’ search for high-quality work, as a way to diminish mutual prejudice and to break stereotypes and finally as opportunity for natives to acquire skills to deal with challenges beyond the borders of their home-country. In my analysis, I try to identify personal characteristics and environmental factors that influence German natives’ personal relationships with persons of non-German origin. Ego-centered network research on intergroup relationships has so far neglected the native part of such relationships in favor of the non-native side. Information on over 18,000 German natives’ visiting contacts at home were collected by the Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP) between 2007 and 2015 in five waves and thereby enable longitudinal analyses that focus on intra-personal changes. Exploiting SOEP-survey-data enriched with small-scale neighborhood information, a wide range of possible determinants, including occupational status, neighborhood composition and attitudes towards migration are researched.

    Referent/-in
    Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 223
    13. Januar 2016

    Cluster-Seminar Öffentliche Finanzen und Lebenslagen Labor Market Frictions and Retirement Timing in Germany – A Structural Model and Subsequent Ex-Ante Policy Evaluation

    Losing a job after age 60 in Germany is virtually equivalent to the end of one’s working life. Roughly 25% of job exits after age 60 are involuntary with considerable variation along region, age, tenure and education. Considering this, I estimate a structural model of retirement timing in the presence of labor market frictions. A subsequent ex-ante policy analysis is meant to illustrate the likely consequences of shifting the regular retirement age to 67 (“Rente mit 67”) in terms of average retirement age. Scenarios without frictions provide an upper bound for the reaction potential of the work force and likely to overestimate the true effect.

    Referent/-in
    Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 264
    9. Dez 2015

    Cluster-Seminar Öffentliche Finanzen und Lebenslagen Labor supply and the pension system - Evidence from a Regression Kink Design

    This paper uses a Regression Kink Design to estimate the labor supply effects of changes in the financial incentives for early retirement. In particular we examine the effect of the gradual introduction of pension deductions for early retirement according to the 1992 German pension reform on the actual retirement age of women eligible for women old-age pensions. This reform allows to exploit exogenous variation in  benefits using kinks in the schedule of pension benefits depending on the birth cohort. For the empirical analysis we use high-quality administrative data from the German Federal Pension Insurance (VSKT) and find positive and significant effects of the reform on the actual retirement age.

    Referent/-in
    Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 264
    25. Nov 2015

    Cluster-Seminar Öffentliche Finanzen und Lebenslagen Family structure and educational attainment in East and West Germany during the 20th century – a sibling analysis

    This study investigates whether the link between family dissolution and children’s educational attainment is contingent on the broader social and institutional context. The comparison of former capitalist West Germany and socialist East Germany presents an excellent case study as these countries differed considerably with regard to ideology and policies regarding families, schooling and labour markets. We base our analyses on the data of the German Life History Study that covers cohorts born throughout the twentieth century. Results of sibling fixed effect analyses show that growing up in a dissolved family in the former West was detrimental for educational attainment. In contrast, in the East with its comprehensive schooling system and extensive support for families and working mothers, family dissolution was not related to educational outcomes. The effects of family dissolution may thus be reinforced in stratified systems and possibly softened by social policies equalizing the social and economic situation attributed to dissolved families.

    Referent/-in
  • Wiebke Schulz, Universität Bielefeld

  • Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 264
    4. Nov 2015

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar Rejectionism & Engagement: How Hostility Affects Immigrant Minorities’ Political Behavior

    How does xenophobic behavior and radical right-wing activity affect ethnic and immigrant minorities' political behavior? The extant literature on radical right-wing and xenophobic politics focuses exclusively on what drives these anti-immigrant political attitudes and behaviors, but does not account for how the targets of this animosity and threat react. Alternatively, the literature on immigrant and ethnic minority political behavior extensively examines the role of institutions and policy, thereby focusing on the macro-level effects on micro-level behavior, but overlooks the meso-level in which the social and political environment can  play a huge role. Using federal data on radical right-wing events and the German Socio-Economic Panel Survey, this project examines how individuals with a migration-background react politically to xenophobic threats.

    Referent/-in
  • Carolyn Morgan (Ohio State University)

  • Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 223
    2. Oktober 2015

    Workshop KOMIED Workshop

    Ein Workshop im Rahmen des von der Leibniz-Gemeinschaft geförderten Forschungsprojektes

    Kommunale Infrastrukturunternehmen zwischen Energiewende und demografischem Wandel (KOMIED) - Industrieökonomische Analysen mit Mikrodaten der Energie-, Wasser- und Abfallwirtschaft

    Mehr Informationen
    Ort
    Geschäftsstelle der Leibniz-Gemeinschaft Room 1.15 Chausseestr. 111 10115 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 679
    1. - 2. Oktober 2015

    Veranstaltung Lebensqualitätsforschung zwischen Wissenschaft und Politikberatung
    Jahrestagung der DGS-Sektion Soziale Indikatoren in Zusammenarbeit mit dem Forschungsverbund Berichterstattung zur sozioökonomischen Entwicklung in Deutschland

    Die DGS-Sektion Soziale Indikatoren wird ihre diesjährige Jahrestagung in Zusammenarbeit mit dem soeb-Verbund unter dem Titel "Lebensqualitätsforschung zwischen Wissenschaft und Politikberatung" ausrichten.

    Die Bundesregierung plant, im Zuge der Regierungsstrategie „Gut leben – Lebensqualität in Deutschland“ ein Indikatorensystem
    zu entwickeln und im Laufe der 18. Legislaturperiode vorzustellen. Damit erhöht sich der Stellenwert des Themas Lebensqualität
    auf der politischen und öffentlichen Agenda. Diese, für die Wohlfahrtsforschung erfreuliche Entwicklung wird zum Anlass
    genommen, über Ansätze und Befunde der Lebensqualitätsforschung zu diskutieren: Welche Konzepte bieten sich an? Wie stellt
    sich Lebensqualität in Deutschland (und Europa) empirisch dar? Was wissen wir über die gesellschaftspolitische Gestaltbarkeit
    des guten Lebens?

    Mehr Informationen
    Eingeladen von
    Ort
    DIW Berlin (Schumpeter Hall) Mohrenstr. 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 690
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 283
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    extern
    Jan Delhey, Sektionssprecher Soziale Indikatoren, Otto-von-Guericke Universität Magdeburg
    Anmeldung: Frau Fuhrmann-Herzberg, Sekretariat Allgemeine Soziolo-gie/Makrosoziologie, Otto-von-Guericke-Universität Magdeburg: manuela.fuhrmann-herzberg@ovgu.de
    1 2 3 4