Events - Archive

The Events of the Research Infrastructure 'Socio- Economic Panel Study (SOEP)'

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16 February 2018

DIW Applied Micro Seminar The Intergenerational Causal Effect of Tax Evasion: Evidence from the Commuter Tax Allowance in Austria

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Speaker
  • Martin Halla, Johannes Kepler University Linz

  • Inviter
    Time
    13:15 - 14:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 165
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 673
    14 February 2018

    Cluster-Seminar Public Finances and Living Conditions The Impact of Initial Placement Restrictions on Labor Market Outcomes of Refugees

    This paper analyzes employment effects of a policy reform that was introduced as a measure for targeted integration of foreigners into local labor markets in Germany. The Residence Rule puts additional constraints on initial residence decisions for refugees after having received a permanent residence permit. Given that this reform applies to a subset of refugees only, it creates exogenous variation that I exploit in a Differences-in-Differences analysis. Using a novel data set, the IAB-BAMF-SOEP Survey of Refugees in Germany, the results suggest a negative effect of the reform on the probability to take up employment. This effect is robust to the inclusion/exclusion of covariates. Yet, since sample size in the post-treatment period is relatively small, some specifications yield statistically insignificant effects.

    Speaker
    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Gustav-Schmoller-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 3.3.002A Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 369
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 383
    7 February 2018

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar Disappointed Hopes of Upward Mobility? A Study on Income Development in Germany 1995-2015

    Similar to many other OECD countries, income inequality in Germany has increased over the past decades. However, it is not yet clear to what extent there has actually been a decline at the household level. Our study therefore examines what is behind the increased income inequality: increases or decreases of household incomes or a change in the composition of the population. Using SOEP data from 1995-2015 and hybrid panel regressions, we show that income inequality increases between different educational groups and EGP-classes, as well as between migrants and Germans.
    Furthermore, we show that the increasing income inequality at the household level cannot be attributed solely to a change in the composition of the population, but that disadvantaged households have experienced lower increases in disposable household income over time than other households.
    These findings suggest that hopes of upward income mobility are increasingly disappointed among the more disadvantaged population groups in recent years.

    Related Articles:

    Blossfeld, Hans-Peter, Buchholz, Sandra, Bukodi, Erzsébet und Karin Kurz (Hg.) (2008): Young Workers,
    Globalizaton and the Labor Market. London: Edward Elgar.

    Hartmann, Jörg (2016): Do second-generaton Turkish migrants in Germany assimilate into the middle
    class? In Ethnicites 16 (3), S. 368–392.

    Speaker
  • Karin Kurz and Jörg Hartmann (both University of Göttingen)

  • Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 235
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 688
    31 January 2018

    Cluster-Seminar Public Finances and Living Conditions Income Redistribution and Self-Selection of Immigrants: Evidence from Administrative Data

    We test the predictions of the Roy-Model about the self-selection of immigrants using an administrative dataset including about 90 % of Italians living abroad. The data comprises 13 countries with substantial differences in inequality and levels of redistribution: Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, France, Great-Britain, Germany, The Netherlands, New-Zealand, Switzerland, the US, and Venezuela. Our results confirm the predictions of the model: We find a negative, substantial and significant relationship between the level of redistribution – our indicator for the returns to human capital, measured by the (relative) difference of market and after-tax inequality in the host country in the year of arrival – and immigrants’ individual degree of selection, as well as the likelihood to be positively self-selected. These results hold after including covariates at the individual and country level, as well as controlling for migration costs. Our analysis also shed light on the factors associated with the self-selection of immigrants.

    (joint work with Giacomo Corneo)

    Speaker
    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Gustav-Schmoller-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 3.3.002A Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 369
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 383
    24 January 2018

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar The relationship between trust, cognitive abilities, and democracy. Evidence from 30 countries around the world

    Beside risk preferences, willingness to trust in others is one of the key requirements in economic transactions. A growing literature in economics deals with the question what factors determine an individual’s willingness to trust. Existing results highlight a strong and robust positive correlation between measures of cognitive abilities and trust measures. However, most of the existing literature only focuses on single country studies, or is only able to include proxies for cognitive ability. The present study applies data from the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) including survey measures of trust for 30 countries around the world. In addition, PIAAC contains comprehensive measures of cognitive abilities in three domains, numerical skills, literacy skills, and problem solving skills. The results show, that the average level of trust varies substantially among the analyzed countries with the Scandinavian countries ranked at the top of the scale. The evidence supports a positive correlation between trust and cognitive abilities over all countries. This result is robust to including country fixed effects or controlling for country characteristics. However, the strength of this relationship varies substantially between countries.
    Including measures of democracy in the respective countries shows that the strength of the relationship between trust and cognitive skills increases with the level of democracy in a society. In the second part of the paper, based on PIAAC-L – a longitudinal extension of the German PIAAC data – German reunification is used as a natural experiment to analyze the effect of democracy in a setting that allows for a more causal interpretation. The results support the finding of a positive effect of democracy on the relationship between trust and cognitive ability.

    Speaker
    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 235
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 688
    17 January 2018

    Cluster-Seminar Public Finances and Living Conditions Hurricanes, nightlights and the elusive comparative advantage of offshore finance

    A number of small offshore jurisdictions exhibit disproportionally large international capital positions. According to governments of these jurisdictions, such positions are (a) the result of a comparative advantage in providing financial services internationally and (b) improve welfare in these jurisdictions. I use the natural experiment of re-occuring hurricanes to test if (a) the capital positions in these jurisdictions react in line with real economic activity on the island as measured by satellite data on nightlights and (b) if such jurisdictions have an advantage in providing a public good (hurricane resilience) when compared to similar jurisdictions not engaged in offshore finance. Preliminary results suggest that hurricanes have a significant impact on local economic activity but not on capital positions. This suggests that the activities leading to such positions take place elsewhere and are not due to a local 'comparative advantage'. Preliminary evidence on public good provision is mixed suggesting some dissemination of funds acquired through offshore finance activities.

    Speaker
    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 369
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 383
    16 January 2018

    Event Release of the World Inequality Report 2018

    The DIW Berlin is happy to invite you to join the presentation of the first release of the World Inequality Report conducted by the internationally leading inequality experts centered around Thomas Piketty and Gabriel Zucman.


    Economic inequality is widespread and has been growing since the 1980s questioning economic growth policies over the world. The report will be introduced by its general director Lucas Chancel. Thereafter, Charlotte Bartels will present her findings on the evolution of economic inequality in Germany from 1871 to 2013, summarized in the German chapter in the World Inequality Report. Albeit the big political and economic changes affecting Germany over the past 150 years, inequality remained surprisingly stable. In a podium discussion, Lucas Chancel, Charlotte Bartels, and Hartmut Kaelble will discuss long-term implications of rising inequality for the world and Germany.

    Please find here the executive summary of the World Inequality Report 2018

    Speaker
  • Charlotte Bartels is a postdoctoral researcher at DIW Berlin/SOEP. Her research is in the fields of empirical public and labor economics, in particular, the distribution of income and wealth in a long-run perspective.

    Lucas Chancel is codirector of the World Inequality Lab and of the World Wealth and Income Database (WID.world) at the Paris School of Economics. He is also a Lecturer at Sciences Po and general coordinator of the World Inequality Report 2018.

    Hartmut Kaelble is a senior professor of social history at the Department of Economic and Social History at Humboldt University, Berlin. His most recent book is “Mehr Reichtum, mehr Armut” (More Wealth, more poverty) (campus 2017). He has published widely on inequality, social mobility and comparative history of Europe.

    Welcome address by: Prof. Dr. Stefan Liebig | DIW Berlin

  • Time
    3.00 pm - 4.30 pm
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Schumpeter Hall) Mohrenstr. 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 181
    20 Dec 2017

    Cluster-Seminar Public Finances and Living Conditions Positive Effects of Class Size Reductions on Student Achievement in Germany

    Using a unique dataset on the full student population of 3rd graders in the German state Saarland, we exploit plausibly random variation in class size between cohorts within the same school to estimate the effect of class size on student achievement. Conventional estimates of class size effects are shown to be severely biased by systematic sorting of students between and within schools. Correcting for this, we find that smaller classes are beneficial for language and math test scores and also reduce grade repetition.

    Speaker
    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 369
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 383
    13 Dec 2017

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar The Short-Term Distributional Effects of the German Minimum Wage Reform

    This study quantifies the short-term distributional effects of the new statutory minimum wage in Germany. Using detailed survey data (German Socio-Economic Panel), we assess changes in the distributions of hourly wages, contractual and actual working hours, and monthly earnings. Our descriptive results indicate growth at the bottom of the hourly wage distribution in the post-reform year, but also considerable noncompliance among eligible employees. In a second step, we employ a difference-in-differences analysis and exploit regional variation in the ``bite'' of the intervention, measured by the share of employees in a geographical region with wages below the minimum wage prior to the reform. We document the reform's positive effect at the bottom of the wage distribution. However, we find a negative effect of the reform on contractual hours worked, which explains why there is no effect on monthly earnings. At the same time, actual hours worked remain unchanged, suggesting an increase in unpaid overtime.

    (together with Marco Caliendo, Malte Preuss, Carsten Schröder, Linda Wittbrodt)

    Speaker
    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 235
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 688
    8 Dec 2017

    DIW Applied Micro Seminar How do Fuel Taxes Impact New Car Purchases? An Evaluation Using French Consumer-level Data

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    Speaker
  • Pauline Givord, INSEE, Paris

  • Inviter
    Time
    13:15 - 14:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Ferdinand-Friedensburg-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 2.3.001 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 210
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 165
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 673
    6 Dec 2017

    Cluster-Seminar Public Finances and Living Conditions The Effects of Fees on Study Duration and Completion in the Population of German Students

    This paper exploits unexpected regional changes in fees to uncover the causal effect on the duration of study and completion probabilities for an entire country. The empirical analysis relies on a novel empirical framework that merges difference-in-difference estimation with duration analysis to exploit a natural policy experiment, namely the introduction and terminationof fees for university studies in several German states. This strategy allows uncovering effects of fees on the intensive margin, while holding constant extensive margin responses such as changes in the composition of the student body or migration responses that occur due to fees.We find that even modest fees have large and significant impacts on study duration and will also examine if the private costs paid by students are recovered through pubilc savings due to students studying faster.

    Speaker
    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 369
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 383
    1 Dec 2017

    DIW Applied Micro Seminar The Hidden Side of Dynamic Pricing: Evidence from the Airline Market

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    Speaker
  • Claudio Piga, Keele University, Staffordshire

  • Inviter
    Time
    13.15 - 14.30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 210
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 165
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 673
    22 Nov 2017

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar Sensitivity Analysis of Real Income Growth in the SOEP

    A frequently cited result derived from the SOEP suggests that the poorest two quintiles of the population had hardly experienced any real income growth since reunification, and in addition, they did not benefit from the recent positive economic development in Germany. However, the real rise of only 1 per cent turns into growth of nearly 8 per cent over the last 20 years if the start of the investigated period is shifted slightly and if the influence of the newly added migration sample in 2013 is adjusted for. Likewise, the previously observed minus 8.5 per cent real income loss of the poorest ten percent shifts to a real gain of 5.7 percent since 1994. Furthermore, in relative terms the lower income groups have gained as much of the positive economic development of the past decade as the middle and upper income groups. Similar adjustments for the newly added samples of specific family types suggest that these estimates are rather lower bounds of real income growth in recent years.

    Related Article:
    Judith Niehues, 2017, Einkommensentwicklung, Ungleichheit und Armut – Ergebnisse unterschiedlicher Datensätze, in: IW-Trends 3/2017

    Speaker
  • Judith Niehues (IW Köln)

  • Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Ferdinand-Friedensburg-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 2.3.001 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 235
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 688
    22 Nov 2017

    Cluster-Seminar Public Finances and Living Conditions The Effect of Parental Leave Policies in Frictional Labor Markets

    I analyze the impact of labor market risks on fertility and female labor supply in a dynamic structural life-cycle model. In particular, I provide insights on whether parental leave policies, such as legal job protection periods, can mitigate these risks. To this end, I estimate a dynamic discrete choice model, using a rich German panel dataset, for the time period between 2007 and 2013. Preliminary findings suggest a strong impact of parental leave job protection on fertility.

    A current version of the working paper can be downloaded from here

    Speaker
    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 369
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 383
    17 Nov 2017

    DIW Applied Micro Seminar The Role of Mothers and Fathers in Providing Skills – Evidence from Parental Deaths

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    Speaker
  • Helena Holmlund, IFAU, Uppsala

  • Inviter
    Time
    13:15 - 14:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 210
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 165
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 673
    15 Nov 2017

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar Comparing Survey Data and Administrative Records on Gross Earnings: Nonreporting, Misreporting, Survey-Mode, and Earnings Inequality

    The extent of earnings inequality is usually determined using survey data, but these data may not be accurate. Research indicates that some respondents are likely to avoid reporting their gross earnings and others are likely to misreport them. In addition, the format of the survey might affect the accuracy of responses to sensitive questions on issues such as earnings. Given these three possibilities, researchers’ conclusions might be biased. By comparing survey and administrative data, we looked for the nonreporting and misreporting biases suggested by the literature. We also investigated the mode of data collection as a source of nonreporting and misreporting bias. Finally, we analyzed the effects of nonreporting, misreporting, and the mode of data collection on conclusions on the degree of overall earnings inequality. The analyses drew on data from the German employee survey “Legitimation of Inequality Over the Life-Span” and linked administrative data from the Federal Employment Agency (N = 2,282). Using the administrative data as a benchmark, we found that respondents at the lower and upper end of the earnings distribution were more likely to not report or misreport their earnings. Interviewer presence led to higher nonreporting rates as well. Overall inequality was severely underestimated because of nonreporting whereas misreporting had little impact on conclusions on overall inequality.

    Speaker
  • Peter Valet, Jule Adriaans, and Stefan Liebig (University Bielefeld

  • Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 235
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 688
    27 October 2017

    DIW Applied Micro Seminar Follow the Money: Piracy and Online Advertising

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    Speaker
  • Christian Peukert, UCP Católica-Lisbon

  • Inviter
    Time
    13.15 - 14.30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 210
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 165
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 673
    25 October 2017

    Cluster-Seminar Public Finances and Living Conditions Stricter Eligibility Criteria in Disability Insurance: Effects on Diagnoses Protection

    Since the 2001 reform of the disability pension in Germany, occupational invalidity does no longer qualify for a pension. While before the reform the incapability to work in the former job was sufficient for a pension claim, the new regulations require an incapability to work at all. Yet, cohorts born before 1961 have been exempted from the reform to protect their confidence in former legislation. This exogenous variation along birth cohorts allows us to estimate the causal reform effects on pension take-up rates and diagnoses composition using a Regression Discontinuity Design. Working with a 25% sample from the registers of the Statutory Pension Scheme, we show that take-up drops significantly. A disproportionally high share of newly non-eligible individuals suffers from musculoskeletal disorders.

    Speaker
    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 369
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 383
    18 October 2017

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar Tax and Transfer Policies and the Female Labor Supply in the EU

    This study measures the effect of tax-benefit policies on female labor supply based on a broad sample of 26 European countries in 2005-2010. The tax-benefit microsimulation model EUROMOD is used to calculate a measure of work incentives at the extensive margin - the participation tax rate, which is then used as the main explanatory variable in a female employment equation. This allows me to deal with the endogeneity of income in a new way by using a simulated instrumental variable based on a fixed EU-wide sample of women. Results suggest that a 10 percentage point increase in the participation tax rate decreases the female employment probability by 2 percentage points. The effect is higher for single mothers, for women in the middle of the skills distribution, and in countries that have lower rates of female employment.

    Speaker
  • Klará Kaliskova (Charles University Prague)

  • Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 235
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 688
    22 Sept 2017

    DIW Applied Micro Seminar Choosing to Compete Against Self or Others - Gender Differences

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    Speaker
  • Elif Ece Demiral, George Mason University, Virginia, USA

  • Inviter
    Time
    13.15 - 14.30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 210
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 165
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 673
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