Veranstaltungen

Bildung und Familie

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16 February 2018

DIW Applied Micro Seminar The Intergenerational Causal Effect of Tax Evasion: Evidence from the Commuter Tax Allowance in Austria

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Speaker
  • Martin Halla, Johannes Kepler University Linz

  • Inviter
    Time
    13:15 - 14:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 165
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 673
    14 February 2018

    Cluster-Seminar Public Finances and Living Conditions The Impact of Initial Placement Restrictions on Labor Market Outcomes of Refugees

    This paper analyzes employment effects of a policy reform that was introduced as a measure for targeted integration of foreigners into local labor markets in Germany. The Residence Rule puts additional constraints on initial residence decisions for refugees after having received a permanent residence permit. Given that this reform applies to a subset of refugees only, it creates exogenous variation that I exploit in a Differences-in-Differences analysis. Using a novel data set, the IAB-BAMF-SOEP Survey of Refugees in Germany, the results suggest a negative effect of the reform on the probability to take up employment. This effect is robust to the inclusion/exclusion of covariates. Yet, since sample size in the post-treatment period is relatively small, some specifications yield statistically insignificant effects.

    Speaker
    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Gustav-Schmoller-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 3.3.002A Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 369
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 383
    31 January 2018

    Cluster-Seminar Public Finances and Living Conditions Income Redistribution and Self-Selection of Immigrants: Evidence from Administrative Data

    We test the predictions of the Roy-Model about the self-selection of immigrants using an administrative dataset including about 90 % of Italians living abroad. The data comprises 13 countries with substantial differences in inequality and levels of redistribution: Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, France, Great-Britain, Germany, The Netherlands, New-Zealand, Switzerland, the US, and Venezuela. Our results confirm the predictions of the model: We find a negative, substantial and significant relationship between the level of redistribution – our indicator for the returns to human capital, measured by the (relative) difference of market and after-tax inequality in the host country in the year of arrival – and immigrants’ individual degree of selection, as well as the likelihood to be positively self-selected. These results hold after including covariates at the individual and country level, as well as controlling for migration costs. Our analysis also shed light on the factors associated with the self-selection of immigrants.

    (joint work with Giacomo Corneo)

    Speaker
    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Gustav-Schmoller-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 3.3.002A Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 369
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 383
    17 January 2018

    Cluster-Seminar Public Finances and Living Conditions Hurricanes, nightlights and the elusive comparative advantage of offshore finance

    A number of small offshore jurisdictions exhibit disproportionally large international capital positions. According to governments of these jurisdictions, such positions are (a) the result of a comparative advantage in providing financial services internationally and (b) improve welfare in these jurisdictions. I use the natural experiment of re-occuring hurricanes to test if (a) the capital positions in these jurisdictions react in line with real economic activity on the island as measured by satellite data on nightlights and (b) if such jurisdictions have an advantage in providing a public good (hurricane resilience) when compared to similar jurisdictions not engaged in offshore finance. Preliminary results suggest that hurricanes have a significant impact on local economic activity but not on capital positions. This suggests that the activities leading to such positions take place elsewhere and are not due to a local 'comparative advantage'. Preliminary evidence on public good provision is mixed suggesting some dissemination of funds acquired through offshore finance activities.

    Speaker
    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 369
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 383
    20 Dec 2017

    Cluster-Seminar Public Finances and Living Conditions Positive Effects of Class Size Reductions on Student Achievement in Germany

    Using a unique dataset on the full student population of 3rd graders in the German state Saarland, we exploit plausibly random variation in class size between cohorts within the same school to estimate the effect of class size on student achievement. Conventional estimates of class size effects are shown to be severely biased by systematic sorting of students between and within schools. Correcting for this, we find that smaller classes are beneficial for language and math test scores and also reduce grade repetition.

    Speaker
    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 369
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 383
    8 Dec 2017

    DIW Applied Micro Seminar How do Fuel Taxes Impact New Car Purchases? An Evaluation Using French Consumer-level Data

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    Speaker
  • Pauline Givord, INSEE, Paris

  • Inviter
    Time
    13:15 - 14:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Ferdinand-Friedensburg-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 2.3.001 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 210
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 165
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 673
    6 Dec 2017

    Cluster-Seminar Public Finances and Living Conditions The Effects of Fees on Study Duration and Completion in the Population of German Students

    This paper exploits unexpected regional changes in fees to uncover the causal effect on the duration of study and completion probabilities for an entire country. The empirical analysis relies on a novel empirical framework that merges difference-in-difference estimation with duration analysis to exploit a natural policy experiment, namely the introduction and terminationof fees for university studies in several German states. This strategy allows uncovering effects of fees on the intensive margin, while holding constant extensive margin responses such as changes in the composition of the student body or migration responses that occur due to fees.We find that even modest fees have large and significant impacts on study duration and will also examine if the private costs paid by students are recovered through pubilc savings due to students studying faster.

    Speaker
    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 369
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 383
    1 Dec 2017

    DIW Applied Micro Seminar The Hidden Side of Dynamic Pricing: Evidence from the Airline Market

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    Speaker
  • Claudio Piga, Keele University, Staffordshire

  • Inviter
    Time
    13.15 - 14.30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 210
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 165
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 673
    22 Nov 2017

    Cluster-Seminar Public Finances and Living Conditions The Effect of Parental Leave Policies in Frictional Labor Markets

    I analyze the impact of labor market risks on fertility and female labor supply in a dynamic structural life-cycle model. In particular, I provide insights on whether parental leave policies, such as legal job protection periods, can mitigate these risks. To this end, I estimate a dynamic discrete choice model, using a rich German panel dataset, for the time period between 2007 and 2013. Preliminary findings suggest a strong impact of parental leave job protection on fertility.

    A current version of the working paper can be downloaded from here

    Speaker
    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 369
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 383
    17 Nov 2017

    DIW Applied Micro Seminar The Role of Mothers and Fathers in Providing Skills – Evidence from Parental Deaths

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    Speaker
  • Helena Holmlund, IFAU, Uppsala

  • Inviter
    Time
    13:15 - 14:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 210
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 165
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 673
    27 October 2017

    DIW Applied Micro Seminar Follow the Money: Piracy and Online Advertising

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    Speaker
  • Christian Peukert, UCP Católica-Lisbon

  • Inviter
    Time
    13.15 - 14.30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 210
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 165
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 673
    25 October 2017

    Cluster-Seminar Public Finances and Living Conditions Stricter Eligibility Criteria in Disability Insurance: Effects on Diagnoses Protection

    Since the 2001 reform of the disability pension in Germany, occupational invalidity does no longer qualify for a pension. While before the reform the incapability to work in the former job was sufficient for a pension claim, the new regulations require an incapability to work at all. Yet, cohorts born before 1961 have been exempted from the reform to protect their confidence in former legislation. This exogenous variation along birth cohorts allows us to estimate the causal reform effects on pension take-up rates and diagnoses composition using a Regression Discontinuity Design. Working with a 25% sample from the registers of the Statutory Pension Scheme, we show that take-up drops significantly. A disproportionally high share of newly non-eligible individuals suffers from musculoskeletal disorders.

    Speaker
    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 369
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 383
    22 Sept 2017

    DIW Applied Micro Seminar Choosing to Compete Against Self or Others - Gender Differences

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    Speaker
  • Elif Ece Demiral, George Mason University, Virginia, USA

  • Inviter
    Time
    13.15 - 14.30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 210
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 165
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 673
    20 Sept 2017

    Cluster-Seminar Public Finances and Living Conditions Labor Market Responses to Tax Reforms

    In a high-tax labor market like France, tax reductions are a popular tool to support employment of low-wage workers. The welfare implications of these exemptions go beyond the directly affected. We ask three questions. First, because employment and wages are determined by both supply and demand of labor, what are the equilibrium effects of tax reductions on different workers? Second, since policy-makers' horizons may be short, are short-run effects very different from long-run outcomes? Finally, thirdly, who should benefit from tax reductions? To answer these questions we estimate an equilibrium search-and-matching model with worker and firm heterogeneity based on French administrative data. While a narrowly focused low-wage tax reduction has distributional advantages, it negatively affects productivity by encouraging job creation from low-productivity firms, making it harder for high-productivity workers to find suitable matches. We simulate short-run effects on employment and welfare and find that they may be contrary to the long-run equilibrium effects.
    (joint work with Thomas Breda and Luke Haywood)

    Speaker
  • Haomin Wang

  • Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 369
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 383
    8 Sept 2017

    DIW Applied Micro Seminar The Effects of Mandatory Disclosure of Supermarket Prices

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    Speaker
  • Itai Ater, Tel Aviv University

  • Inviter
    Time
    13.15 - 14.30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 210
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 165
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 673
    30 August 2017

    Cluster-Seminar Public Finances and Living Conditions Obvious Mistakes in a Strategically Simple College Admissions Environment

    We provide direct field evidence that, even though the Hungarian college admissions process uses a strategically simple assignment mechanism, a large fraction of the applicants employ a dominated strategy. These applicants make obvious mistakes: they forgo the option for a tuition waiver worth thousands of dollars, even though this behavior has no benefit. In many cases, applicants would have received the tuition waiver had they asked for it. Obvious mistakes are more common among low-achieving students and high-socioeconomic-status students. Costly mistakes transfer tuition waivers from high- to low-socioeconomic status applicants and increase the number of students attending college. We exploit exogenous variation in the availability of tuition waivers and find that a rise in program selectivity substantially increases the likelihood of obvious mistakes, especially among high socioeconomic status applicants and low-achieving applicants.

    abstract

    Speaker
  • Sándor Sóvágó (VU Amsterdam)

  • Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 369
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 383
    19 July 2017

    Cluster-Seminar Public Finances and Living Conditions The effect of parental education on the offspring's mental health

    We are the first to estimate the causal effect of parental education on a wide range of the adult offspring's mental health outcomes. Theoretical considerations predict positive direct and indirect effects of parental education on the offspring's mental health. But the relation between parental education and mental health outcomes is plagued by endogeneity. To circumvent this problem, we exploit exogenous variation in schooling which is completely unrelated to the offspring's mental health. In contrast to our theoretical considerations, we find no positive effects of parental education on the offspring's mental health. Moreover, preliminary results point at a negative effect of parental education and the offspring's mental health.

    Speaker
    Time
    12:30 - 13:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 369
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 383
    23 June 2017

    DIW Applied Micro Seminar Business Owners, Employees and Firm Performance

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    Speaker
  • Mika Maliranta, ETLA & University of Jyväskylä

  • Inviter
    Time
    13:15-14:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 210
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 165
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 673
    23 June 2017

    Cluster-Seminar Public Finances and Living Conditions Retirement and social connection in old age

    Facing an aging population, many societies discuss policies to prolong work lives. At the individual level, such policies could affect social connectedness in several ways. On the one hand, prolonged work lives could promote a healthier social life at advanced ages by maintaining job-related networks for longer. On the other hand, retirement might boost quantity and quality of social networks by an increase in leisure time. This paper sheds light on the net effects of retirement on social wellbeing and the elderly’s social networks with a particular focus on heterogeneity patterns. Using data from SHARE, we analyze whether country, gender, or education are important dimensions of heterogeneity. Potential endogeneity of the individual retirement status is accounted for using an instrumental variables approach. We thereby exploit variation in the individual retirement decision that is induced by pensionable age thresholds. The results suggest that retirement is not an important determinant for social connectedness. Moreover, effect heterogeneity is not particularly pronounced in the dimensions under study.

    Speaker
    Time
    11:30 - 12:30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Arthur-Cecil-Pigou-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 3.3.002C Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 369
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 383
    8 June 2017

    DIW Applied Micro Seminar Consumer Valuation of Fuel Costs and Tax Policy: Evidence from the European Car Market

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    Extra Seminar on Thursday
    Speaker
  • Laura Grigolon, Mc Master University, Ontario

  • Inviter
    Time
    13.15 - 14.30
    Location
    DIW Berlin (Eleanor-Dulles-Raum) DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Room 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Contact(s)
    at DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 210
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 165
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 673
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