Team

Ulrich C. Schneider

Ulrich C. Schneider
Funktion
Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter
Abteilung
Staat
Arbeitsbereich(e)
Sozialpolitik
Arbeitsschwerpunkte

Public Economics, Labor Economics, Behavioral Economics

    Publikationen am DIW Berlin

    DIW Roundup (2015)

    Geplante und tatsächliche Erwerbsunterbrechungen von Müttern

    Sascha Drahs, Ulrich Schneider, Philipp Schrauth

    Vorträge am DIW Berlin

  • Vortrag 33rd Annual Congress of the European Economic Association - 71th European Meeting of the Econometric Society : EEA - ESEM 2018
    Köln, 27.08.2018 - 31.08.2018

    Life-Cycle Cost of Overconfidence : Evidence from German Maternity Leave Reforms
    Ulrich C. Schneider

  • Vortrag Cluster-Seminar Öffentliche Finanzen und Lebenslagen: Life-Cycle Cost of Overconfidence: Evidence from German Maternity Leave Reforms
    Berlin, 08.11.2017

    Life-Cycle Cost of Overconfidence : Evidence from German Maternity Leave Reforms
    Ulrich C. Schneider

  • Vortrag Second Retreat of the CRC TR190 "Rationality and Competition" : Workshop
    Tutzing, 27.09.2017 - 29.09.2017

    Life-Cycle Cost of Overconfidence : Evidence from German Maternity Leave Reforms
    Ulrich C. Schneider

  • Vortrag Natural Experiments and Controlled Field Studies : Workshop
    Ohlstadt, 23.06.2017 - 25.06.2017

    Time Preferences and Female Labor Supply
    Ulrich C. Schneider

  • Vortrag 69th European Meeting of the Econometric Society : ESEM 2016
    Genf, Schweiz, 22.08.2016 - 26.08.2016

    Labor Supply of Mothers : The Role of Time Discounting
    Peter Haan, Luke Haywood, Ulrich C. Schneider

  • Lebenslauf - Kurzfassung

    I am a Ph.D. student at Freie Universität Berlin and a research associate at the public economics department at DIW Berlin.

    I am an applied microeconomist whose research integrates elements of labor, public and behavioral economics. In particular, I study how career dynamics are affected by bounded rationality. My research identifies potential limitations of rational decision making and quantifies their consequences. Additionally, I analyze how public policy can aid individuals in making more efficient choices.

    In my job market paper, I demonstrate how expectations about future employment prospects can be identified using exogenous variation caused by policy reforms. Estimations show that mothers strongly overestimate their future employment prospects, which causes longer career breaks and increases the costs of motherhood.