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DIW Economic Bulletin 50 / 2017

German Economy Booming but Not to the Point of Overheating: Editorial

2017| Ferdinand Fichtner, Dawud Ansari, Guido Baldi, Karl Brenke, Martin Bruns, Marius Clemens, Kristina van Deuverden, Christian Dreger, Hella Engerer, Marcel Fratzscher, Stefan Gebauer, Simon Junker, Claus Michelsen, Malte Rieth, Thore Schlaak, Aleksandar Zaklan
DIW Economic Bulletin 36 / 2017

German Economy Still Running at High Capacity: DIW Economic Outlook

The German economy is on track for continued growth. Due to the unexpectedly robust first six months of 2017, the German Institute for Economic Research is raising its forecast for GDP growth to 1.9 percent for the current year. This year and arguably for the coming two years, the country’s output will exceed potential output; nonetheless, there is no risk of overheating. Economic growth will slow

2017| Ferdinand Fichtner, Karl Brenke, Marius Clemens, Simon Junker, Claus Michelsen, Thore Schlaak
DIW Economic Bulletin 36 / 2017

German Economy Continues Steady Upswing with no Sign of Overheating: Editorial

2017| Ferdinand Fichtner, Guido Baldi, Karl Brenke, Marius Clemens, Christian Dreger, Hella Engerer, Marcel Fratzscher, Stefan Gebauer, Simon Junker, Claus Michelsen, Malte Rieth, Thore Schlaak
DIW Economic Bulletin 24 / 2017

German Economy in Good Shape: DIW Economic Outlook

The German economy is in the midst of a robust economic cycle: the number of employed persons has reached historic highs and is still increasing powerfully; private household income is on the rise; and the public coffers are overflowing. Inflation is rising only gradually, partly because capacities are not overburdened. The mood is bright among consumers and firms alike, with economic development

2017| Ferdinand Fichtner, Karl Brenke, Simon Junker, Claus Michelsen, Thore Schlaak, Kristina van Deuverden
DIW Economic Bulletin 24 / 2017

German Economy on Track: Editorial

2017| Ferdinand Fichtner, Guido Baldi, Karl Brenke, Christian Dreger, Hella Engerer, Marcel Fratzscher, Stefan Gebauer, Simon Junker, Claus Michelsen, Malte Rieth, Thore Schlaak, Kristina van Deuverden
DIW Economic Bulletin 11 / 2017

German Economy: Strong Employment Growth, Weak Investment Activity: DIW Economic Outlook

The German economy's upward growth trend continues, with the economic output expected to increase by 1.4 percent this year with slightly overloaded capacities. Employment growth remains strong with the creation of 600,000 new jobs, which has in turn led to an increase in private consumption – one of the key growth drivers of the German economy. The higher inflation rates are dampening purchasing

2017| Ferdinand Fichtner, Karl Brenke, Marius Clemens, Simon Junker, Claus Michelsen, Thore Schlaak, Kristina van Deuverden
DIW Economic Bulletin 11 / 2017

Despite Uncertainty in the Global Economy, Germany Is on a Solid Growth Path: Editorial

2017| Ferdinand Fichtner, Marcel Fratzscher, Guido Baldi, Karl Brenke, Marius Clemens, Christian Dreger, Hella Engerer, Stefan Gebauer, Michael Hachula, Simon Junker, Robert Lange, Claus Michelsen, Malte Rieth, Thore Schlaak, Kristina van Deuverden
DIW Economic Bulletin 10 / 2017

How Rising Income Inequality Influenced Economic Growth in Germany

The cumulative growth rate of the German economy since reunification would have been around two percentage points higher if income inequality had remained constant. This is whatsimulations using the DIW Macroeconomic Model have shown. They were made under the assumption that the income distribution dynamics would not be influenced by any feedback effects of economic growth. In 2015, Germany’s real

2017| Hanne Albig, Marius Clemens, Ferdinand Fichtner, Stefan Gebauer, Simon Junker, Konstantin Kholodilin
DIW Economic Bulletin 50 / 2016

Despite Weaker Job Market, Germany’s Economic Upswing Continues

In spite of persisting unfavorable external economic conditions, the German economy’s upward trend continues, with a growth of 1.2 percent expected for the coming year – slightly less than the 1.8 percent growth rate of 2016, a difference primarily due to the fact that 2017 has fewer workdays. A growth rate of 1.6 percent is expected for 2018. Although employment growth has slowed down somewhat

2016| Ferdinand Fichtner, Karl Brenke, Marius Clemens, Simon Junker, Claus Michelsen, Maximilian Podstawski, Thore Schlaak, Kristina van Deuverden
DIW Economic Bulletin 36 / 2016

German Economy: Upward Trend Continues Despite Brexit Vote’s Dampening Effect

2016| Ferdinand Fichtner, Karl Brenke, Marius Clemens, Simon Junker, Claus Michelsen, Maximilian Podstawski, Thore Schlaak, Kristina van Deuverden
122 Ergebnisse, ab 81