DIW Berlin: Publikationssuche

Publikationssuche

clear
122 Ergebnisse, ab 91
DIW Economic Bulletin 31 / 2016

Brexit Decision Puts Strain on German Economy

As a result of Britain’s decision to leave the EU, global economic output is likely to grow at a somewhat slower pace than anticipated. The decision will have consequences for the UK and for the euro area in particular; this is also confirmed by simulations produced by the National Institute Global Econometric Model (NiGEM). An expected deterioration of economic relations—especially between the UK

2016| Ferdinand Fichtner, Christoph Große Steffen, Michael Hachula, Simon Junker, Simon Kirby, Claus Michelsen, Malte Rieth, Thore Schlaak, James Warren
DIW Economic Bulletin 24/25 / 2016

German Economy on a Stable Growth Path

Supported by dynamic domestic demand, the German economy is expected to grow by 1.7 percent this year. As consumption and investment in construction are likely to weaken in the coming year, is hardly contributing to growth 2017 should amount to roughly 1.4 percent. Foreign trade is contributing relatively little to growth. In both years of the forecast period, capacities will be at more or less

2016| Ferdinand Fichtner, Karl Brenke, Marius Clemens, Simon Junker, Claus Michelsen, Maximilian Podstawski, Thore Schlaak, Kristina van Deuverden
DIW Economic Bulletin 11 / 2016

German Economy Back on Track, Despite Weak Global Economy

The global economy is stalling. Global production increased by only 3.3 percent last year—the lowest growth rate since the financial crisis—and is expected to rise by only 3.3 percent in 2016 as well, which is lower than originally predicted. The reason for the sluggish growth lies primarily in the changes taking place in the emerging countries: the Chinese economy continues to lose momentum, and

2016| Ferdinand Fichtner, Guido Baldi, Franziska Bremus, Karl Brenke, Simon Junker, Claus Michelsen, Maximilian Podstawski, Thore Schlaak, Kristina van Deuverden
DIW Economic Bulletin 50-52 / 2015

Domestic Demand Drives German Economy

The German economy is expected to grow by 1.7 percent this year, and to maintain this pace in 2016 as well. The rate of growth should slow down slightly (to 1.5 percent) in 2017, but only because the number of working days will be lower due to the timing of public holidays. The global economy is growing at a slower pace than it has been in recent years, but will pick up speed during the forecast

2015| Ferdinand Fichtner, Guido Baldi, Franziska Bremus, Karl Brenke, Christian Dreger, Hella Engerer, Christoph Große Steffen, Simon Junker, Claus Michelsen, Katharina Pijnenburg, Maximilian Podstawski, Malte Rieth, Kristina van Deuverden
DIW Economic Bulletin 45/46 / 2015

Integrating Refugees: A Long-Term, Worthwhile Investment

The debate about the massive influx of refugees into Germany often focuses solely on the short-term costs. But while these expenditures are bound to be substantial inthe coming years, the discussion neglects the long-term economic potential of a successful integration of refugees—often, young people—which can transform the initial expenditure into a worthwhile investment. Even if many of the

2015| Marcel Fratzscher, Simon Junker
DIW Economic Bulletin 38 / 2015

DIW Economic Outlook

The German economy is on track, and will likely grow by 1.8 percent this year; in the coming year, with a slight increase in dynamics, it will grow by 1.9 percent. With these figures DIW Berlin confirms its forecast from this summer. Employment growth continues; the unemployment rate will decrease this year to 6.4 percent, where it will remain in 2016. Due to the sharp drop in oil prices this year

2015| Ferdinand Fichtner, Guido Baldi, Franziska Bremus, Karl Brenke, Christian Dreger, Hella Engerer, Christoph Große Steffen, Simon Junker, Claus Michelsen, Katharina Pijnenburg, Maximilian Podstawski, Malte Rieth, Dirk Ulbricht, Kristina van Deuverden
DIW Economic Bulletin 35 / 2015

Growth through Research and Development

DIW Berlin has examined the effects of investment in research and development on economic growth in Germany and other OECD countries. Their results show that an increase of one percentage point in research and development spending in the economy as a whole leads to a short-term average increase in GDP growth of approximately 0.05 to 0.15 percentage points. The coefficient for Germany is at the

2015| Heike Belitz, Simon Junker, Max Podstawski, Alexander Schiersch
DIW Economic Bulletin 26 / 2015

Upswing of German Economy Prevails

2015| Ferdinand Fichtner, Guido Baldi, Franziska Bremus, Karl Brenke, Christian Dreger, Hella Engerer, Christoph Große Steffen, Simon Junker, Claus Michelsen, Katharina Pijnenburg, Maximilian Podstawski, Malte Rieth, Kristina van Deuverden
122 Ergebnisse, ab 91