DIW Berlin: Thema Ressourcenmärkte

Thema Ressourcenmärkte

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1063 Ergebnisse, ab 1
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The Impact of Implementing a Consumption Charge on Carbon-Intensive Materials in Europe

The production of basic materials accounts for around 25% of global greenhouse gas emissions. Existing measures to reduce emissions from industry are limited due to a combination of competitiveness concerns and a lack of technological options available to producers. In this paper, we assess the possibility of implementing a materials charge to reduce demand for basic industrial products and, hence

In: Climate Policy (2020), im Ersch. [online first: 2019-06-19] | Hector Pollitt, Karsten Neuhoff, Xinru Lin
Diskussionspapiere 1856 / 2020

Technology Policy and Market Structure: Evidence from the Power Sector

We show how policies to trigger clean technologies change price competition and market structure. We present evidence from electricity markets, where regulators have implemented different policies to subsidize clean energy. Building on a multi-unit auction model, we show that currently applied subsidy designs either foster or attenuate competition. Fixed, price-independent output subsidies decrease

2020| Moritz Bohland, Sebastian Schwenen
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Between Stranded Assets and Green Transformation: Fossil-Fuel-Producing Developing Countries Towards 2055

Climate-related asset stranding refers to the depreciation of assets – such as resource reserves, infrastructure, or industries – resulting from the unanticipated changes, such as the tightening of climate policies. Although developing countries – especially fossil-fuel exporters – may be most concerned by this issue, its analysis in development (economics) has so far been limited.We aim at

In: World Development 130 (2020), 104947, 17 S. | Dawud Ansari, Franziska Holz
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Energy Outlooks Compared: Global and Regional Insights

We compare prominent global energy scenarios of organizations and companies. We supplement the analysis with four own scenarios, which were derived from structured analytic techniques in combination with a numerical global energy and resource market model (Multimod). Our paper provides three central contributions: (i) a compact survey of selected outlooks with meta characteristics (conceptual

In: Economics of Energy and Environmental Policy 9 (2020), 1, S. 21-42 | Dawud Ansari, Franziska Holz, Hashem al-Kuhlani
DIW Berlin - Politikberatung kompakt 148 / 2020

Klimaschutz statt Kohleschmutz: Woran es beim Kohleausstieg hakt und was zu tun ist

2020| Pao-Yu Oei, Mario Kendziorski, Philipp Herpich, Claudia Kemfert, Christian von Hirschhausen
Diskussionspapiere 1840 / 2020

The Role of Aggregators in Facilitating Industrial Demand Response: Evidence from Germany

Industrial demand response can play an important part in balancing the intermittent production from a growing share of renewable energies in electricity markets. This paper analyses the role of aggregators – intermediaries between participants and the electricity market – in facilitating industrial demand response. Based on the results from semi-structured interviews with German demand response

2020| Jan Stede, Karin Arnold, Christa Dufter, Georg Holtz, Serafin von Roon, Jörn C. Richstein
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Do Benefits from Dynamic Tariffing Rise? Welfare Effects of Real-Time Retail Pricing Under Carbon Taxation and Variable Renewable Electricity Supply

We analyze the gross welfare gains from real-time retail pricing in electricity markets where carbon taxation induces investment in variable renewable technologies. Applying a stylized numerical electricity market model, we find a U-shaped association between carbon taxation and gross welfare gains. The benefits of introducing real-time pricing can accordingly be relatively low at relatively high

In: Environmental & Resource Economics 75 (2020), S. 183-213 | Christian Gambardella, Michael Pahle, Wolf-Peter Schill
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Lessons from Germany’s Hard Coal Mining Phase-Out: Policies and Transition from 1950 to 2018

German hard coal production ended in 2018, following the termination of subsidies. This paper looks at 60 years of continuous decline of an industry that employed more than 600,000 people, through a case study comparing Germany’s two largest hard coal mining areas (Ruhr area and Saarland). Although predominantly economic drivers underlay the transitions, both provide valuable lessons for upcoming

In: Climate Policy (2020), im Ersch. [online first: 2019-11-28] | Pao-Yu Oei, Hanna Brauers, Philipp Herpich
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