Skip to content!

Climate Policy Department Publications

clear
0 filter(s) selected
close
Go to page
remove add
453 results, from 361
  • Refereed essays Web of Science

    Policy Complementarity and the Paradox of Carbon Pricing

    We present an economics framework appropriate to the exceptionally broad scope of the climate change problem. This considers that economic and social processes, particularly those involved in purposive transitions of energy technologies and systems, involve the interplay between three distinct domains of decision-making and associated actors. The first concerns small-scale and often short-term decision-making, ...

    In: Oxford Review of Economic Policy 39 (2023), 4, S. 711-730 | Michael Grubb, Alexandra Poncia, Paul Drummond, Karsten Neuhoff, Jean-Charles Hourcade
  • Refereed essays Web of Science

    Supporting the Transition to Climate-Neutral Production: An Evaluation Under the Agreement on Subsidies and Countervailing Measures

    To reach climate neutrality, carbon emissions from the production of basic materials need to be curtailed. When governments encourage this transition by adopting support measures, the measures must comply with the Agreement on Subsidies and Countervailing Measures. This article analyzes three selected support schemes under the Agreement on Subsidies and Countervailing Measures: (i) free allocation ...

    In: Journal of International Economic Law 26 (2023), 2, S. 216–232 | Roland Ismer, Harro van Asselt, Jennifer Haverkamp, Michael Mehling, Karsten Neuhoff, Alice Pirlot
  • Refereed essays Web of Science

    Institutional Coordination Arrangements as Elements of Policy Design Spaces: Insights from Climate Policy

    This study offers insights into the institutional arrangements established to coordinate policies aiming at the mitigation of and adaptation to climate change. Drawing on the literature on policy design, we highlight institutional arrangements as elements of policy design spaces and contend that they fall into four categories that either stress the political or problem orientation of this activity: ...

    In: Policy Sciences 56 (2023), 1, S. 49–68 | Heiner von Lüpke, Lucas Leopold, Jale Tosun 
  • Refereed essays Web of Science

    Green Premiums Are a Challenge and an Opportunity for Climate Policy Design: Comment

    Adjusting green public support programmes to green premiums can reduce public spending, yet this is challenged by uncertainty. Underfunding green technologies can delay the green transition, and overfunding them can increase transition costs. Both risks of under- and overfunding can be reduced using responsive adjustments.

    In: Nature Climate Change 13 (2023), S. 592-595 | Till Köveker, Olga Chiappinelli, Mats Kröger, Oliver Lösch, Karsten Neuhoff, Jörn C. Richstein, Xi Sun
  • Refereed essays Web of Science

    Reacting to Changing Paradigms: How and Why to Reform Electricity Markets

    The energy crisis and the accelerated transition to climate neutrality result in a shift from the traditional energy trilemma to an “energy quartet” across Europe. Firstly, the criteria of affordability, previously focused on short-term price developments, broadens to reliable affordability including in crises. Secondly, clean energy traditionally focused on clean production now extends to clean energy ...

    In: Energy Policy 180 (2023), 113691, 7 S. | Karsten Neuhoff, Jörn C. Richstein, Mats Kröger
  • Refereed essays Web of Science

    The Price of Natural Gas Dependency: Price Shocks, Inequality, and Public Policy

    The 2022 natural gas price spikes across Europe raised concerns regarding their distributional consequences. This paper investigates the distributional effect of price increases between and, in particular, within different income groups in Germany, accounting for different determinants of gas expenditures. The study finds that low-income households are affected the most by the gas price increase. Low-income ...

    In: Energy Policy 175 (2023), 113472, 17 S. | Mats Kröger, Maximlian Longmuir, Karsten Neuhoff, Franziska Schütze
  • Refereed essays Web of Science

    Carbon Contracts-for-difference: How to De-risk Innovative Investments for a Low-carbon Industry?

    The shift to climate neutrality requires new process technologies for energy-intensive industries, such as steel, chemicals, or cement. A variety of technology options exist – but they face the challenges of (i) first-of-kind costs, (ii) higher operation and investment costs, and (iii) insufficient and uncertain carbon prices, which partly stem from political uncertainty. Existing innovation policy ...

    In: iScience 25 (2022), 8, 104700, 20 S. | Jörn C. Richstein, Karsten Neuhoff
  • Refereed essays Web of Science

    Carbon Leakage, Consumption, and Trade

    We review the state of knowledge concerning international CO2 emission transfers associated particularly with trade in energy-intensive goods and concerns about carbon leakage arising from climate policies. The historical increase in aggregate emission transfers from developing to developed countries peaked around 2006 and declined since. Studies find no evidence that climate policies lead to carbon ...

    In: Annual Review of Environment and Resources 47 (2022), S. 753-795 | Michael Grubb, Nino David Jordan, Edgar Hertwich, Karsten Neuhoff, Kasturi Das, Kaushik Ranjan Bandyopadhyay, Harro van Asselt, Misato Sato, Ranran Wang, William A. Pizer, Hyungna Oh
  • Refereed essays Web of Science

    Financing Renewables in the Age of Falling Technology Costs

    Cost of renewable energies have dropped, approaching wholesale power price levels. As a result, the role of renewable energy policy design is shifting – from covering incremental costs towards facilitating risk-hedging. An analytical model of the financing structure of renewable investment projects is developed to assess this effect und used to compare different policy design choices: contracts for ...

    In: Resource and Energy Economics 70 (2022), 101330, 15 S. | Karsten Neuhoff, Nils May, Jörn C. Richstein
  • Refereed essays Web of Science

    Too Good to Be True? Time-inconsistent Renewable Energy Policies

    The transition to low-carbon economies requires massive investments into renewable energies, which are commonly supported through regulatory frameworks. Yet, governments can have incentives – and the ability – to deviate from previously announced support policies once those investments have been made, which can deter investments. We analyze a renewable energy dynamic regulation game and derive under ...

    In: Energy Economics 112 (2022), 106102, 16 S. | Nils May, Olga Chiappinelli
453 results, from 361
keyboard_arrow_up