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144 results, from 21
  • Cluster-Seminar Öffentliche Finanzen und Lebenslagen

    Average Wage Gaps and Expected Wage Cuts - An Investigation of Selection Neglect Bias in Income Expectations

    Economists spend much of their lives talking about and correcting for sample selection. Recent evidence from behavioral economics documents that participants in lab experiments don't account for selection effects when they interpret conditional distributions. This "selection neglect" can distort expectations in settings where individuals learn from comparisons with other people who differ in...

    13.11.2019| Annekatrin Schrenker
  • Cluster-Seminar Öffentliche Finanzen und Lebenslagen

    Does later retirement change your health care consumption? Evidence from France

    This paper examines the causal impact of later retirement on outpatient care consumption among the French elderly. Outpatient care are defined as all the care provided out of the hospital setting. This question is of interest since spill effects may arise if later retirement increases health care expenditures. To deal with reverse causality issue, I use, as an instrumental variable, the 1993...

    30.10.2019| Elsa Perdrix, Paris School of Economics
  • Cluster-Seminar Öffentliche Finanzen und Lebenslagen

    Investment Losses and Inequality

    Systematic differences along the wealth distribution in investment performance will potentially have large consequences for the level and persistence of wealth inequality. These differences in performance are hard to measure except in a few, select countries with detailed information on household portfolios. In this paper we use a modified version of the Global Capital Asset Pricing Model ...

    07.08.2019| Johannes König
  • Cluster-Seminar Öffentliche Finanzen und Lebenslagen

    Wealth inequality in Germany, 1895-2017

    (together with Thilo Albers (HU Berlin) und Moritz Schularick (Uni Bonn)) This paper provides the first long-run wealth inequality series for Germany. We combine wealth tax data, survey data, national accounts' household balance sheets, and lists of large wealth holders to study the accumulation and distribution of wealth in Germany from 1895 to 2017. We find that wealth concentration in...

    24.07.2019| Charlotte Bartels
  • Research Project

    The gender wage gap and the role of policy: Analyzing patterns over time, over the life cycle and across the wage distribution

    The gender wage gap is a persistent and pervasive phenomenon observable in virtually all countries. It has strong implications for a society since it is one main driver of inequality in a country. Therefore, there exists an active public debate and an important academic literature that describes and quantifies the gender wage gap, analyses the reasons for this gap and discusses potential policy...

    Current Project| Gender Economics, Public Economics
  • Cluster-Seminar Öffentliche Finanzen und Lebenslagen

    Was Marx Right? Income Inequality, Market Concentration and Voting in late 19th Century Germany

    The  recent  debate  on  the  causes  and  consequences  of  income  inequality shows striking similarity to the debate in many parts of Europe before 1914. Today and back then the focus was on the role of capital share and market concentration as a cause for rising inequality.  In this study we analyze the drivers and consequences of...

    06.02.2019| Charlotte Bartels
  • Externe Monographien

    The Effect of Increasing the Early Retirement Age on Savings Behavior before Retirement

    Facing a reduction in pension generosity, individuals can compensate the loss by working longer or saving more. This paper shows that the impact of changes in pension generosity on saving crucially depends on the possibility of prolonging future employment. Exploiting across cohort variation in expected pension wealth induced by a 3-year lift in early retirement age for women born after 1951 in Germany, ...

    Bonn: IZA, 2019, 40 S. : Anh.
    (Discussion Paper Series / Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit ; 12744)
    | Stefan Etgeton, Björn Fischer, Han Ye
  • Externe referierte Aufsätze

    Looking for the Missing Rich: Tracing the Top Tail of the Wealth Distribution

    We analyse the top tail of the wealth distribution in France, Germany, and Spain using the first and second waves of the Household Finance and Consumption Survey (HFCS). Since top wealth is likely to be under-represented in household surveys, we integrate big fortunes from rich lists, estimate a Pareto distribution, and impute the missing rich. In addition to the Forbes list, we rely on national rich ...

    In: International Tax and Public Finance 26 (2019), 6, S. 1234-1258 | Stefan Bach, Andreas Thiemann, Aline Zucco
  • DIW Weekly Report 26/27 / 2019

    Fear of Stigmatization Prevents Individuals from Claiming Benefits

    The desire to avoid the shame of being dependent on government aid is often cited as a cause of low welfare take-up rates. In contrast to other obstacles, such as transaction costs or a lack of information, little empirical research has been conducted on how stigma affects social benefits take-up. In this Weekly Report, a controlled laboratory experiment is presented whose results support the following ...

    2019| Jana Friedrichsen, Renke Schmacker
  • DIW Weekly Report 46/47/48 / 2019

    100 Years of the Modern German Tax System: Foundation, Reforms, and Challenges

    The tax and fiscal reforms headed by German finance minister Matthias Erzberger in 1919 and 1920 fundamentally reshaped German public finances. The total tax revenue as a percentage of GDP, or tax-to-GDP ratio, doubled and increased continually until the end of World War II. Since the 1950s, the tax-to-GDP ratio has remained between 22 and 24 percent of GDP most of the time. West Germany’s economic ...

    2019| Stefan Bach
144 results, from 21
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