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Monographien

Legal Status at Entry, Economic Performance, and Self-Employment Proclivity: A Bi-National Study of Immigrants

Bonn: IZA, 2005, 38 S.
(Discussion Paper Series / Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit ; 1910)
| Amelie Constant, Klaus F. Zimmermann
Diskussionspapiere 547 / 2006

Legal Status at Entry, Economic Performance, and Self-Employment Proclivity: A Bi-National Study of Immigrants

There are concerns about the attachment of immigrants to the labor force, and the potential policy responses. This paper uses a bi-national survey on immigrant performance to investigate the sorting of individuals into full-time paid-employment and entrepreneurship and their economic success. Particular attention is paid to the role of legal status at entry in the host country (worker, refugee, and ...

2006| Amelie Constant, Klaus F. Zimmermann
Externe referierte Aufsätze

European Labour Mobility: Challenges and Potentials

European Union economies are pressed by (i) a demographic change that induces population ageing and a decline of the workforce, and (ii) a split labour market that is characterized by high levels of unemployment for low-skilled people and a simultaneous shortage of skilled workers. This lack of flexible high-skilled workers and the aging process has created the image of an immobile labour force and ...

In: De Economist 153 (2005), 4, S. 425-450 | Klaus F. Zimmermann
Diskussionspapiere 560 / 2006

Native-Migrant Differences in Risk Attitudes

This paper questions the perceived wisdom that migrants are more risk-loving than the native population. We employ a new large German survey of direct individual risk measures to find that first-generation migrants have lower risk attitudes than natives, which only equalize in the second generation.

2006| Holger Bonin, Amelie Constant, Konstantinos Tatsiramos, Klaus F. Zimmermann
Externe referierte Aufsätze

The Making of Entrepreneurs in Germany: Are Native Men and Immigrants Alike?

This paper uses a state of the art three-stage estimation technique to identify the determinants of the self-employed immigrant and native men in Germany. Their making is surprisingly alike. Employing data from the German Socioeconomic Panel 2000 (GSOEP) release we find that self-employment is not significantly affected by exposure to Germany or by human capital. But this choice has a very strong intergenerational ...

In: Small Business Economics 26 (2006), 3, S. 279-300 | Amelie Constant, Klaus F. Zimmermann
Monographien

Native-Migrant Differences in Risk Attitudes

Bonn: IZA, 2006, 9 S.
(Discussion Paper Series / Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit ; 1999)
| Holger Bonin, Amelie Constant, Konstantinos Tatsiramos, Klaus F. Zimmermann
Diskussionspapiere 643 / 2006

Gender, Ethnic Identity and Work

The European Union's strategy to raise employment is confronted with very low work participation among many minority ethnic groups, in particular among immigrants. This study examines the potential of immigrants' identification with the home and host country ethnicity to explain that deficit. It introduces a two-dimensional understanding of ethnic identity, as a combination of commitments to the home ...

2006| Amelie Constant, Liliya Gataullina, Klaus F. Zimmermann
Monographien

Gender, Ethnic Identity and Work

Bonn: IZA, 2006, 27 S.
(Discussion Paper Series / Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit ; 2420)
| Amelie Constant, Liliya Gataullina, Klaus F. Zimmermann
SOEPpapers 26 / 2007

When Have All the Graduates Gone? Internal Cross-State Migration of Graduates in Germany 1984-2004

The present paper analyzes the out-migration of graduates to other German states or abroad based on the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP). Applying duration analysis, it can be shown that, ten years after graduation, slightly more than seventy percent of the graduates still live in the state where they completed their studies. The parametric estimation model identifies personal characteristics that ...

2007| Oliver Busch
Weekly Report 2 / 2008

German Emigration: Not a Permanent Loss of University Graduates

In 2006 about 155 000 Germans left their country - more than ever before apart from the postwar wave of emigration in the 1950s. However, many recent German emigrants return to their home country. Although the question of why this rise has occurred is now arousing much attention from the general public and in research, comprehensive analyses have not so far been possible owing to the lack of an adequate ...

2008| Claudia Diehl, Steffen Mau, Jürgen Schupp
429 results, from 381