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Externe referierte Aufsätze

Immigrant's Economic Performance across Europe: Does Immigration Policy Matter?

Drawing on panel data from the European Community Household Panel (ECHP), the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS) and the German Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP), we compare the economic performance of immigrants to Great Britain, West Germany, Denmark, Luxembourg, Ireland, Italy, Spain and Austria to that of the respective indigenous population. The unit of analysis is the individual in the household ...

In: Population Research and Policy Review 24 (2005), 2, S. 175-212 | Felix Büchel, Joachim R. Frick
Weitere Aufsätze

Economic and Social Perspectives of Immigrant Children in Germany

In: Edda Currle, Tanja Wunderlich (Hrsg.) , Deutschland - ein Einwanderungsland?
Stuttgart : Lucius und Lucius
S. 299-325
| Joachim R. Frick, Gert G. Wagner
Diskussionspapiere 283 / 2002

Gaining Access to Housing in Germany: The Foreign Minority Experience

Housing is a critical component of household well being and the extent to which minority households have achieved parity with Germans is a measure of the extent to which this population is integrated into the larger German society. Specifically we examine whether the housing conditions for immigrants2 has improved between 1985 and 1998 despite the greater barriers to upward mobility for low skill workers ...

2002| Anita I. Drever, William A. V. Clark
SOEPpapers 459 / 2012

Explaining Reurbanization: Empirical Evidence of Intraregional Migration as a Long-Term Mobility Decision from Germany

Following the discussion on reurbanization (changing intra-regional migration patterns), our research project treats transport-related consequences of this spatial development in German city regions. The hypothesis is that reurbanization bears potential to spread environmentally friendly ways of organizing daily mobility - but that the chance ofthose positive effects might be given away, if policy ...

2012| Gesa Matthes
Externe referierte Aufsätze

How Important Is Cultural Background for the Level of Intergenerational Mobility?

Based on brother correlations in permanent earnings for different groups of second generation immigrants, the findings in this paper indicate that cultural background is not a major determinant of the level of intergenerational economic mobility.

In: Economics Letters 114 (2012), 3, S. 335-337 | Daniel D. Schnitzlein
DIW Economic Bulletin 5 / 2011

Success Despite Starting out at a Disadvantage: What Helps Second-Generation Migrants in France and Germany?

The educational and employment trajectories of migrant children in France and Germany are extremely diverse. The few successful ones dominate the public eye. Yet successful biographies of young adults with a migration background are in no way a negligible exception. However, the picture is different in the two countries: while in France more migrants' descendants manage to reach their (secondary?) ...

2011| Ingrid Tucci, Ariane Jossin, Carsten Keller, Olaf Groh-Samberg
Sonstige Publikationen des DIW / Aufsätze 2012

Success Despite Starting out at a Disadvantage: What Helps Second-Generation Migrants in France and Germany?

2012| Ingrid Tucci, Arian Jossin, Carsten Keller, Olaf Groh-Samberg
SOEPpapers 448 / 2012

Migrant's Pursuit of Happiness: The Impact of Adaption, Social Comparison and Relative Deprivation; Evidence from a 'Natural' Experiment

The German reunification, which several economists have called a 'natural' experiment, provides the unique possibility to inquire the impact of migration on subjective well-being (SWB). The main goal of the research is to assessing the impact of adaptation, social comparison and relative deprivation on the change in SWB associated with moving from Eastern to Western Germany after the German reunification ...

2012| Silvia Maja Melzer, Ruud J. Muffels
SOEPpapers 413 / 2011

Testing the 'Residential Rootedness': Hypothesis of Self-Employment for Germany and the UK

Based on the notion that entrepreneurship is a 'local event' , the literature argues that selfemployed workers and entrepreneurs are 'rooted' in place. This paper tests the 'residential rootedness'-hypothesis of self-employment by examining for Germany and the UK whether the self-employed are less likely to move or migrate than employees. Using longitudinal data from the German Socio-economic Panel ...

2011| Darja Reuschke, Maarten Van Ham
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