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442 results, from 421
Monographien

Family Related Transfer and Children's Economic Well-Being in Europe

Luxembourg: CEPS / INSTEAD, 2003, 27 S.
(CHER Working Paper ; 4)
| Joachim R. Frick, Birgit Kuchler
Monographien

Changing Life Patterns in Western Industrial Societies

Amsterdam [u.a.]: Elsevier, 2004, XX, 336 S.
(Advances in Life Course Research ; 8)
| Janet Zollinger Giele, Elke Holst (Eds.)
Diskussionspapiere 537 / 2005

Gender-Job Satisfaction Differences across Europe: An Indicator for Labor Market Modernization

In 14 member states of the European Union, women's relative to men's levels of job satisfaction are compared by using data of the European Household Community Panel. The countries under consideration can be assigned to three different groups. Denmark, Finland and the Netherlands do not show significant gender-job satisfaction differences. In contrast, in Portugal men are more satisfied with their jobs ...

2005| Lutz C. Kaiser
SOEPpapers 32 / 2007

Quantifying the Psychological Costs of Unemployment: The Role of Permanent Income

Unemployment causes significant losses in the quality of life. In addition to reducing individual income, it also creates non-pecuniary, psychological costs. We quantify these non-pecuniary losses by using the life satisfaction approach. In contrast to previous studies, we apply Friedman's (1957) permanent income hypothesis by distinguishing between temporary and permanent effects of income changes. ...

2007| Andreas Knabe, Steffen Rätzel
Monographien

Inequality and Happiness: When Perceived Social Mobility and Economic Reality Do Not Match

München: CESifo, 2010, 41 S.
(CESifo Working Papers ; 3216)
| Christian Bjørnskov, Axel Dreher, Justina A. V. Fischer, Jan Schnellenbach
SOEPpapers 393 / 2011

Does Unemployment Hurt Less if There Is More of It Around? A Panel Analysis of Life Satisfaction in Germany and Switzerland

This paper examines the existence of a habituation effect to unemployment: Do the unemployed suffer less from job loss if unemployment is more widespread, if their own unemployment lasts longer and if unemployment is a recurrent experience? The underlying idea is that unemployment hysteresis may operate through a sociological channel: if many people in the community lose their job and remain unemployed ...

2011| Daniel Oesch, Oliver Lipps
SOEPpapers 394 / 2011

Continuous Training, Job Satisfaction and Gender: An Empirical Analysis Using German Panel Data

Using data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP), this paper analyzes the relationship between training and job satisfaction focusing in particular on gender differences. Controlling for a variety of socio-demographic, job and firm characteristics, we find a difference between males and females in the correlation of training with job satisfaction which is positive for males but insignificant ...

2011| Claudia Burgard, Katja Görlitz
Monographien

The Individual and the Welfare State: Life Histories in Europe

Berlin [u.a.]: Springer, 2011, XX, 285 S. | Axel Börsch-Supan, Martina Brandt, Karsten Hank, Mathis Schröder (Eds.)
SOEPpapers 365 / 2011

How Important Is the Family? Evidence from Sibling Correlations in Permanent Earnings in the US, Germany and Denmark

This paper is the first to analyze intergenerational economic mobility based on sibling correlations in permanent earnings in Germany and to provide a cross-country comparison of Germany, Denmark, and the US. The main findings are as follows: the importance of family and community background in Germany is higher than in Denmark and comparable to that in the US. This holds true for brothers and sisters. ...

2011| Daniel D. Schnitzlein
SOEPpapers 350 / 2010

Broke, Ill, and Obese: The Effect of Household Debt on Health

We analyze the effect of household indebtedness on different health outcomes using data from the German Socio-Economic Panel from 1999-2009. To establish a causal effect, we rely on (a) fixed-effects methods, (b) a subsample of constantly employed individuals, and (c) lagged debt variables to rule out problems of reverse causality. We apply different measures of household indebtedness, such as the ...

2010| Matthias Keese, Hendrik Schmitz
442 results, from 421
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