Skip to content!

Search

clear
0 filter(s) selected
close
Go to page
remove add
444 results, from 431
SOEPpapers 453 / 2012

Life Satisfaction, Household Income and Personality Theory

We show that personality traits mediate the effect of income on Life Satisfaction. The effect is strong in the case of Neuroticism, which measures the sensitivity to threat and punishment, in both the British Household Panel Survey and the German Socioeconomic Panel. Neuroticism increases the usually observed concavity of the relationship: Individuals with higher Neuroticism score enjoy income more ...

2012| Eugenio Proto, Aldo Rustichini
SOEPpapers 425 / 2011

Multidimensional Well-Being at the Top: Evidence for Germany

This paper employs a multidimensional approach for the measurement of well-being at the top of the distribution using German SOEP micro data. Besides income as traditional indicator for material well-being, we include health as a proxy for nonmaterial quality of life as well as self-reported satisfaction with life as dimensions. We find that one third of the German population is well-off in at least ...

2011| Andreas Peichl, Nico Pestel
SOEPpapers 414 / 2011

Predicting the Trend of Well-Being in Germany: How Much Do Comparisons, Adaptation and Sociability Matter?

Using longitudinal data from the German Socio-Economic Panel, we estimate the variation of subjective well-being experienced by Germans over the last two decades testing the role of some of the major correlates of people's well-being. Our results suggest that the variation of Germans' well-being between 1996 and 2007 is well predicted by changes over time of income, demographics and social capital. ...

2011| Stefano Bartolini, Ennio Bilancini, Francesco Sarracino
SOEPpapers 415 / 2011

So Far so Good: Age, Happiness, and Relative Income

In a simple 2-period model of relative income under uncertainty, higher comparison income for the younger cohort can signal higher or lower expected lifetime relative income, and hence either increase or decrease well-being. With data from the German Socio-Economic Panel and the British Household Panel Survey, we first confirm the standard negative effects of comparison income on life satisfaction ...

2011| Felix R. FitzRoy, Michael A. Nolan, Max F. Steinhardt, David Ulph
SOEPpapers 393 / 2011

Does Unemployment Hurt Less if There Is More of It Around? A Panel Analysis of Life Satisfaction in Germany and Switzerland

This paper examines the existence of a habituation effect to unemployment: Do the unemployed suffer less from job loss if unemployment is more widespread, if their own unemployment lasts longer and if unemployment is a recurrent experience? The underlying idea is that unemployment hysteresis may operate through a sociological channel: if many people in the community lose their job and remain unemployed ...

2011| Daniel Oesch, Oliver Lipps
SOEPpapers 394 / 2011

Continuous Training, Job Satisfaction and Gender: An Empirical Analysis Using German Panel Data

Using data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP), this paper analyzes the relationship between training and job satisfaction focusing in particular on gender differences. Controlling for a variety of socio-demographic, job and firm characteristics, we find a difference between males and females in the correlation of training with job satisfaction which is positive for males but insignificant ...

2011| Claudia Burgard, Katja Görlitz
Monographien

The Individual and the Welfare State: Life Histories in Europe

Berlin [u.a.]: Springer, 2011, XX, 285 S. | Axel Börsch-Supan, Martina Brandt, Karsten Hank, Mathis Schröder (Eds.)
SOEPpapers 365 / 2011

How Important Is the Family? Evidence from Sibling Correlations in Permanent Earnings in the US, Germany and Denmark

This paper is the first to analyze intergenerational economic mobility based on sibling correlations in permanent earnings in Germany and to provide a cross-country comparison of Germany, Denmark, and the US. The main findings are as follows: the importance of family and community background in Germany is higher than in Denmark and comparable to that in the US. This holds true for brothers and sisters. ...

2011| Daniel D. Schnitzlein
Monographien

Inequality and Happiness: When Perceived Social Mobility and Economic Reality Do Not Match

München: CESifo, 2010, 41 S.
(CESifo Working Papers ; 3216)
| Christian Bjørnskov, Axel Dreher, Justina A. V. Fischer, Jan Schnellenbach
SOEPpapers 210 / 2009

Does Relative Income Matter? Are the Critics Right?

Do other peoples' incomes reduce the happiness which people in advanced countries experience from any given income? And does this help to explain why in the U.S., Germany and some other advanced countries, happiness has been constant for many decades? The answer to both questions is "Yes". We provide 4 main pieces of evidence. 1) In the U.S. General Survey (repeated samples since 1972) comparator income ...

2009| Richard Layard, Guy Mayraz, Stephen Nickell
444 results, from 431
keyboard_arrow_up