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Externe referierte Aufsätze

No Effect of Birth Order on Adult Risk Taking

Does birth order shape people’s propensity to take risks? Evidence is mixed. We used a three-pronged approach to investigate birth-order effects on risk taking. First, we examined the propensity to take risks as measured by a self-report questionnaire administered in the German Socio-Economic Panel, one of the largest and most comprehensive household surveys. Second, we drew on data from the Basel

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 116 (2019), 13, S. 6019-6024 | Tomas Lejarraga, Renato Frey, Daniel D. Schnitzlein, Ralph Hertwig
SOEPpapers 1041 / 2019

Emotions, Risk Attitudes, and Patience

Previous work has shown that preferences are not always stable across time, but surprisingly little is known about the reasons for this instability. I examine whether variation in people’s emotions over time predicts changes in preferences. Using a large panel data set, I find that within-person changes in happiness, anger, and fear have substantial effects on risk attitudes and patience.

2019| Armando N. Meier
SOEPpapers 1000 / 2018

How Do Households Allocate Risk?

Individuals often have to decide to which degree of risk they want to expose others, or how much risk to accept if their choice has an externality on third parties. One typical application is a household. We run an experiment in the German Socio-Economic Panel with two members from 494 households. Participants have a good estimate of each other’s risk preferences, even if not explicitly informed.

2018| Christoph Engel, Alexandra Fedorets, Olga Gorelkina
SOEPpapers 1003 / 2018

Accuracy of Food Preference Predictions in Couples

The goal of this study was to identify and empirically test variables that indicate how well partners in relationships know each other’s food preferences. Participants (n = 2,854) lived in the same household and were part of a large, nationally representative panel study in Germany. Each partner independently predicted the other’s preferences for several common food items. Results show that

2018| Benjamin Scheibehenne, Jutta Mata, David Richter
SOEPpapers 1077 / 2020

Who Is Bowling Alone? Quantile Treatment Effects of Unemployment on Social Participation

This article examines heterogeneity in the effect of unemployment on social participation. Whereas existing studies on this relationship essentially estimate mean effects, we use quantile regression methods to provide a broader and more complete picture. To ac-count for the potential endogeneity of job loss, we estimate quantile treatment effects (on the treated) based on entropy balancing and

2020| Lars Kunze, Nicolai Suppa
Externe referierte Aufsätze

Accuracy of Food Preference Predictions in Couples

The goal of this study was to identify and empirically test variables that indicate how well partners in relationships know each other's food preferences. Participants (n = 2,854) lived in the same household and were part of a large, nationally representative panel study in Germany. Each partner independently predicted the other's preferences for several common food items. Results show that

In: Appetite 133 (2019), S. 344-352 | Benjamin Scheibehenne, Jutta Mata, David Richter
SOEP Brown Bag Seminar

Health of Nations: A Comparison of Intergenerational Health Mobility in Denmark, Germany and the United States

Equality of opportunity with respect to health outcomes is severely understudied, while in contrast the cases of income and education have received ample attention in the economic literature. This paper is the first to analyze the importance of family background for health in a cross-country comparison. Using comparable survey data we study sibling correlations in five health outcomes in

12.07.2019| Carsten Andersen (Aarhus University)
Externe referierte Aufsätze

Recall – a Way to Mitigate Adverse Effects of Unemployment on Earnings across Occupations?

We examine the reemployment earnings of workers reemployed by a former employer (known as recall) across different occupations. We first ask whether recalls represent a flexibilization strategy that mitigates adverse unemployment effects on workers’ earnings. And second, whether there are any differences in post-unemployment earnings of recalled workers across different occupations. The article

In: Research in Social Stratification and Mobility 60 (2019), S. 39-51 | Susanne Edler, Peter Jacobebbinghaus, Stefan Liebig
Cluster-Seminar Öffentliche Finanzen und Lebenslagen

A firm-side perspective on parental leave

A large literature documents effects of parental leave on mothers' labour market outcomes, yet we know very little about the effects on their  firms and co-workers. We use unique administrative data that covers the universe of employees subject to social security and firms in Germany to address this question. We first establish some novel stylised facts in parental leave-taking  

08.01.2020| Mathias Huebener
Externe referierte Aufsätze

Take Your Time to Grow: A Field Experiment on the Hiring of Youths

We investigate the effect of spells of no formal employment of young Germans on their chances of entering the labor market through an apprenticeship. We also study whether the potential negative effects of such spells can be mitigated by publicly provided training measures. In a field experiment, the fictitious applications of three young women were sent to firms advertising apprenticeships for

In: German Economic Review 20 (2019), 4, S. 706-729 | Dorothea Kübler, Julia Schmid, Robert Stüber
674 results, from 1