Weekly Report , News of 11 October 2018

Consequences of extreme weather events
for developing countries based on the
example of Mongolia

l'imagineur (Copyright)  Etosha-Nationalpark Etosha Nationalpark
Copyright: l'imagineur

In parts of Germany this summer, temperatures were extremely high and there was no rain to speak of: this is an example of an extreme weather event. Many people experienced physical discomfort and the livelihoods of some were threatened. Think of crop damage due to drought. Every unusually hot summer is not the consequence of climate change, nor are all hurricanes and all floods. Earlier decades also had their share of torrential rain and drought. But extreme weather events and climate change are directly related. Climate forecasts predict that in the future, extreme weather events will occur even more frequently and with higher intensity.

Prosperous countries such as Germany can cope with the damage caused by extreme weather comparatively well. Many people and households are insured and when damage is caused by drought, farmers can receive state aid for particularly hard-hit farms. The picture looks quite different in many developing countries. [...]

DIW Weekly Report No. 40/2018 | PDF, 2.37 MB

Extreme weather events threaten the livelihood of herding households in Mongolia (DIW Weekly Report No. 40/2018) | PDF, 217.56 KB

Extreme weather events drastically reduce school completion by Mongolian children (DIW Weekly Report No. 40/2018) | PDF, 242.58 KB

Weather index insurance can help households recover from extreme weather events (DIW Weekly Report No. 40/2018) | PDF, 165.99 KB