Archiv der Veranstaltungen

Vom SOEP organisierte und/oder unterstützte Veranstaltungen

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23. - 27. Sept 2013

SOEPcampus SOEPcampus at datalab2013@uni-bielefeld
Analysepotentiale sozialwissenschaftlicher Forschungsdaten

Beim diesjährigen datalab-Workshop vom 23. bis 27. September 2013 an der Universität Bielefeld werden die Nutzungsmöglichkeiten des Sozio-oekonomischen Panels (SOEP), des Beziehungs- und Familienpanels (pairfam) sowie die Betriebs- und Linked-Employer-Employee-Datensätze (Mannheimer Innovationspanel, Datensätze des Ifo-Instituts und SOEP-Linked-Employer-Employee-Datensatz (SOEP-LEE)) vorgestellt. Der Workshop bietet eine praxisorientierte Einführung in die Nutzung dieser Datensätze. Neben der Vermittlung von Basisinformationen zum Design, Aufbau und den Analysepotentialen werden erste Erfahrungen in der Nutzung der Datensätze durch intensive Übungen am Computer vermittelt. Die Vorstellung der jeweiligen Datensätze erfolgt durch Mitarbeiter der Forschungsdatenzentren der jeweiligen Datenproduzenten in zwei Modulen mit drei parallel angebotenen Veranstaltungslinien (streams).

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Ort
Universität Bielefeld
20. Sept 2013

30 Years of German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP)
Anniversary Colloquium on Happiness Research

The German Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP) is currently collecting its 30th wave of data. We would like to celebrate this milestone with a colloquium on "Happiness Research", which has become one of the central fields of research with the SOEP data over the last ten years.

An increasing number of SOEP users are focusing on themes of satisfaction and happiness in their analyses, and we therefore are delighted to announce that internationally renown researchers have agreed to present their findings in keynote speeches at the colloquium. 

In a special session, awards for the best papers based on SOEP data published in 2011 and 2012 will then be presented by the Chairman of the Board of the Society of Friends of DIW Berlin (VdF), which is also the main sponsor of the colloquium.

How to get there

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Keynote Speakers
  • Conchita D'Ambrosio (University of Luxembourg/Luxembourg), Paul Frijters (University of Queensland/Australia), Bruce Headey (University of Melbourne/Australia), Rich Lucas (Michigan State University/USA), Andrew Oswald (University of Warwick/UK), Nilam Ram (Pennstate University/USA), and Rainer Winkelmann (University of Zurich/Switzerland).
  • Ort
    Hertie School of Governance Raum: Forum A Friedrichstr. 180 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 283
    18. Sept 2013

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar The effects of flexible working hours on German couples' wages

    Working flexible hours is believed to increase an employee's productivity, which is claimed to result in higher wages. This enhancement of productivity is attributed to a reduction in work-life stress as well as to the employee's ability to work non-core hours. Despite these claims, there is no sufficient quantitative evidence as to whether this effect of flexible hours on wages exists. If interpreted as a lack of commitment, taking up flexible working hours could also be punished with lower wages. The SOEP provides a unique opportunity to test these opposing wage arguments. Moreover, with this household panel, for the first time, one can test whether partners profit from changes in couple-level flexibility. Fixed effects analysis is used to test the opposing arguments. Furthermore, the paper looks at who uses the flexible working hours.

    Referent/-in
  • Laura Langner (Rienecker) (University of Oxford)
  • Zeit
    12:30-13:30
    Ort
    Eleanor-Dulles-Raum DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 587
    17. - 18. Sept 2013

    SOEPcampus SOEPcampus@Universität Bamberg 2013
    International SOEP User Workshop

    The SOEP in cooperation with Johannes Giesecke (University of Bamberg) and the Bamberg Graduate School of Social Sciences (BAGSS) will be organizing an international workshop (in English). 

    The workshop offers participants the opportunity to gain a broad, well-grounded understanding of how to work with the SOEP data. In addition to providing an overview of the structure and possibilities for analysis offered by the SOEP, the workshop will focus on questions about the sample and weighting, international comparisons based on the SOEP, and intergenerational analysis. Participation is free of charge.
    If you are interested, please contact SOEP team member Christine Kurka at .

    Mehr Informationen
    Ort
    Universität Bamberg
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 283
    17. Juli 2013

    Cluster-Seminar Öffentliche Finanzen und Lebenslagen Labor supply estimation with endogenous rationing. An application to the federal minimum wage in Germany

    This paper extends a standard static structural labor supply framework by taking labor demand constraints into account. Contrary to previous papers the rationing risk is not only determined by exogenous demand side factors, but also depends on the individual's productivity. The resulting labor supply elasticities from the extended framework differ from the unconstrained model. This approach is shown to be particularly useful for evaluating policy reforms that affect labor supply incentives and have direct consequences for labor costs. We apply the model to analyze the employment effects of a federal minimum wage in Germany as well as the impact of employer- vs. employee-oriented wage subsidies under a statutory minimum.

    Referent/-in
    Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    Eleanor-Dulles-Raum DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 355
    10. Juli 2013

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar What is the effort for? Employment histories and incomes in later life in Europe

    The income situation of the elderly population in modern welfare states is the result of an interplay of individual developments over the life course and the national institutional and policy framework. While achievements on the labor market generally are the basis for the economic status in retirement, their actual effect, however, may vary according to the specific national conditions related to pension system, labor market policy and gender regime. I use data of the SHARELIFE study (3rd wave of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe), which contains life-history information of older individuals in 13 European countries, to analyze individual and institutional determinants of the income situation in later life and their interplay. The results show, first, considerable cross-national variation in the effect of employment history characteristics, especially regarding female part-time employment and family care. Second, institutional factors shape the relationship of employment history and old age income situation of women, while those factors are rather irrelevant for the income situation of older men.
    The talk will also include a comparison of SHARE and SOEP regarding the survey procedures for retrospective employment history information.

    Referent/-in
  • Katja Möhring (GK SOCLIFE, University of Cologne)
  • Zeit
    12:30-13:30
    Ort
    Eleanor-Dulles-Raum DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 587
    3. Juli 2013

    Cluster-Seminar Öffentliche Finanzen und Lebenslagen Your personal public debt

    Everyone is talking about public debt. Europe's economic and financial crisis is, not least, a crisis of sovereign and local government debt. In Germany, along with national and regional government debt, local authorities' obligations are also coming under the spotlight again. Using comprehensive data records, this study analyzes the debt structure of local German authorities from 1998 to 2009. In addition to the risk of rising local government debt, the rapid increase in short-term lending and the terms of local government debt also show an increased risk potential.

    Referent/-in
    Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    Eleanor-Dulles-Raum DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 355
    25. Juni 2013

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar Discoveries from eye-tracking: new ways to improve reporting for sensitive questions

    Referent/-in
  • Olena Kaminska (ISER, University of Essex) joint with Tom Foulsham (Department of Psychology/University of Essex)
  • Zeit
    13:00-14:00
    Ort
    Eleanor-Dulles-Raum DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 376
    19. Juni 2013

    Cluster-Seminar Öffentliche Finanzen und Lebenslagen Natural Disaster, Policy Disaster, Policy Action, and Mental Well-Being: The Case of Fukushima

    We study the impact of the Fukushima disaster on people's mental distress in another industrialized country, 5500 miles away. The meltdown significantly increased environmental concerns by 25% among the German population. Subsequent drastic policy action permanently shut down the oldest nuclear reactors, implemented the phase-out of the remaining ones, and proclaimed the transition to renewables. This energy policy turnaround was largely supported by the population and equalized the increase in mental distress. We fail to detect any significant long-term impact of Fukushima. However, we estimate that during the 3 months after the meltdown, Fukushima triggered external monetized health costs worth €250 per distressed citizen-particularly among risk averse women above 40.

    Autoren
  • Asst. Prof. Dr. Nicolas R. Ziebarth, Cornell University
  • Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    Eleanor-Dulles-Raum DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 355
    17. Juni 2013

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar Special: Maintained Individual Data Distributed Likelihood Estimation

    Maintained Individual Data Distributed Likelihood Estimation (MIDDLE) is a new paradigm for the design and analysis of research in the behavioral, social, and health sciences. The MIDDLE approach is based on the seemingly-impossible idea that data can be privately maintained by participants and never revealed to researchers, while still enabling statistical models to be fit and scientific hypotheses tested. MIDDLE rests on the assumption that data should belong to, be controlled by, and remain in the possession of participants. Since data have value, individuals can thus accumulate personal wealth by participating in science. The innovation of the MIDDLE approach is that statistical models are fit by sending an objective function and vector of parameters to each participants' personal device (e.g., smartphone), where the likelihood of that individual's data is calculated locally. Only the likelihood value is returned to the central optimizer. The optimizer aggregates likelihood values from all participants and chooses a new parameters until the model converges. The MIDDLE paradigm solves or simplifies many current problems that plague human participant research. A MIDDLE study provides significantly greater privacy for participants; automatic management of opt-in and opt-out consent; lower cost for the researcher and funding institute; a larger base of participants; and faster determination of results. MIDDLE facilitates the use of mobile devices that can enable studies to be performed while participants remain in their normal living environments, thus opening paradigm-shifting paths in the way one thinks about research methods. Furthermore, if a participant opts into many studies simultaneously, all of the studies could automatically have access to individual-level longitudinal data sharing.

    Referent/-in
  • Steven Boker (University of Virginia)
  • Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    Eleanor-Dulles-Raum DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 376
    12. Juni 2013

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar 'Are We There Yet?' The Long Journey to a Mature Personality

    There is a long tradition assuming that personality is set like plaster. In recent years, a controversy arose about the appropriateness of the assumption that personality does not change after the age of 30 and is mainly influenced by genes. In this talk, I will focus on the questions of (a) when, (b) how, and (c) why personality changes in adulthood. Using data of the Big Five personality traits from the SOEP and applying different statistical approaches, me and my colleagues arrive at the following conclusions: (a) personality changes across the whole life span with most changes before the age of 30 and after the age of 70, (b) conscientiousness and agreeableness increase whereas openness decreases with age, (c) major life experiences influence personality development and personality maturation is most likely when developmental tasks are successfully mastered. Taken together, reaching a mature personality takes a long journey and can partly be influenced by ourselves.

    Referent/-in
  • Jule Specht, FU Berlin
  • Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    Eleanor-Dulles-Raum DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 376
    5. Juni 2013

    Cluster-Seminar Öffentliche Finanzen und Lebenslagen Education and time investment in children: Is Germany different?

    Parental investment in terms of money and time is considered to be crucial for a child's development. Research on childcare, which is mainly based on US data, agrees that education has a positive impact on maternal caring time, despite the fact that high earning prospects increase the incentives for labor market participation. Given differences in the family support and other aspect of family environment there is no reason to believe that these results apply to all other countries.
    This paper provides evidence for West Germany using the German Time Use Survey (GTUS). Comparable results show no significantly positive effect of college education on childcare time for mothers. This is in particular the case for university education. The highest secondary school degree, however, has a positive impact on childcare for mothers. Households with a university educated mother divide caring responsibilities differently. Their partners spend significantly more time caring, especially during the week. These mothers spend relatively more time caring on weekends and daycare is used more often. On weekends the father's university education has a positive impact on caring time, especially the time spend with the child and another adult. These results are strongly influenced by households with a child that is in pre-school age. Analyzing subcategories of childcare separately reveals that university educated mothers spend relatively less time on basic and recreational care, but more on educational care activities.

    The effects for West Germany are directly contrasted to four other OECD countries and East Germany. In France and East Germany, two areas with a relative high supply of public daycare, the effect of college education for mothers it is even negative on weekdays. In Spain, a typical Southern European country, it is only a little larger than in West Germany. In the Anglo-Saxon countries, UK and US, the marginal effect of education is relatively larger. Controlling for the partner's education shrinks the effect for the US. The partner's characteristic may consequently be one driving force behind the educational effects. The mother's college education has a positive effect on the father's caring time in all countries but the UK and East Germany.

    Referent/-in
  • Verena Lauber, Universität Konstanz
  • Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    Eleanor-Dulles-Raum DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 355
    29. Mai 2013

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar Now, please tell us the name and address of your employer...

    This presentation investigates the response patterns of survey respondents who are asked for the name and address of their employer. Results are of interest for survey methodologists as information on employers is a sensitive piece of information which is difficult to ask for and which might endanger participation to surveys, especially for panel studies like the Socio-economic Panel (SOEP). Results are also of interest for potential users of linked-employer-employee data as these response patterns may lead to selection issues. The SOEP Linked-Employer-Employee-Study (SOEP-LEE) is used as an example and a short introduction to this study will be given. The SOEP-LEE study consist of survey of German employers which was conducted in fall and winter 2012/2013 (N=1708). An "employee first" approach was used by which establishments were interviewed based on address information given by employed participants in the SOEP. The collected establishment data can be linked back to the SOEP to investigate the influence of establishment characteristics on individual level outcomes. Despite its advantages, this approach is used rarely in establishment surveys; hence factors and mechanisms which influence the naming of respondents' employers are not researched sufficiently. More research into respondents' provision of an employer's name and address is however necessary for two reasons: First, item nonresponse to the employer question decreases the sample size of the linked employer-employee sample. Second, selectivity bias might occur when systematic differences exist between respondents who are willing to give their employers name and address and those respondents who are not. This is especially true if the probability of naming the employer, and hence the probability of an establishment being included in the study, depends on characteristic which are of substantial interest for data analysts, such as income, work satisfaction or the health effects of work environments. Systematic differences in respondents' tendency to name their employer are investigated using logistic regression models and the effects of different groups of factors are estimated: (1) personal characteristics of the survey respondent such as demographics, health and personality variables, (2) survey and interview specific factors, (3) organizational characteristics such as size and branch of the company, (4) job characteristics such as income, supervision and time arrangements, and (5) attitudes towards the job such as job satisfaction and worries of job loss. Insights into the response process may guide the design of future questions on the topic and the decision as to when and where to ask this question in a survey context.

    Referent/-in
    Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    Eleanor-Dulles-Raum DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 376
    22. Mai 2013

    Cluster-Seminar Öffentliche Finanzen und Lebenslagen Estimating labour supply elasticity from bunching: Some issues

    Referent/-in
    Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    Eleanor-Dulles-Raum DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 355
    15. Mai 2013

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar DDI on Rails und das neue SOEPinfo

    Das neue SOEPinfo soll den Forscher von der ersten Konzeption seiner Analysen bis zur Veröffentlichung seiner Arbeit begleiten. Die Präsentation stellt die Entwicklung des zugrunde liegenden Systems »DDI on Rails« im größeren Kontext des SOEP und als Teil meiner Promotion dar, reflektiert die bisherige Arbeit -- Live-Demo inklusive -- und gibt einen Ausblick auf die weitere Planung, insbesondere den bevorstehenden Nutzertest.

    Referent/-in
    Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    Eleanor-Dulles-Raum DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 376
    2. Mai 2013

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar The Role of Language Skills in the German Labor Market

    (joint with Ingo Isphording and Sebastian Otten)

    This paper uses data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) to study the effect of language skills on labor market outcomes. To address problems related to endogeneity and measurement error, we construct an instrumental variable based on differences in language acquisition profiles of immigrants across the distribution of linguistic distance between German and the language spoken in the country of origin. Our findings indicate that the effect of language skills on employment probabilities is insignificant, while the positive effect of language skills on wages may be attributed to the sorting of immigrants across occupations. Our results further indicate that OLS regressions systematically underestimate the returns to language skills in the German labor market.

    Referent/-in
  • Mathias Sinning (Australian National University)
  • Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    Eleanor-Dulles-Raum DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 376
    25. April 2013

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar Special: Poverty and Well-Being: A Longitudinal Perspective

    We analyze the multi-faceted effects of poverty on the subjective well-being of individuals. Using panel data on more than 42,500 individuals living in Germany from 1993 to 2010 we show that self-reported satisfaction with life decreases as a result of both contemporaneous and past episodes of poverty. The intensity of contemporaneous poverty also plays an additional negative role. In addition, for poor individuals persistent poverty is more harmful than the same number of years of low income experienced with movements in and out of poverty. The negative effects of being in poverty are permanent and do not vanish over time: individuals do not adapt to poverty, and, even when subsequently out of poverty, they report lower satisfaction with life. These effects differ by population subgroups.

    Referent/-in
  • Conchita D'Ambrosio (University of Milan - Bicocca, Italy) Andrew Clark (Ecole Normale Supérieure (ENS) Paris-Jourdan Sciences Economiques (PSE))
  • Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    Gustav-Schmoller-Raum DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 3.3.002A Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 376
    24. April 2013

    Cluster-Seminar Öffentliche Finanzen und Lebenslagen Reducing binge drinking? The effect of a ban on late-night off-premise alcohol sales on alcohol-related hospital stays

    Excessive alcohol consumption among the youth is a major public health concern both in Germany and Europe. In March 2010 the German federal state of Baden-Württemberg banned the sale of alcoholic beverages between 10pm and 5am in off-premise outlets (e.g. petrol stations, supermarkets). We use monthly administrative data from a 70% random sample of all hospital admissions for the years 2007-2010 in order to evaluate the impact of this policy on alcohol-related hospitalizations. Applying a difference-in-difference approach, we find that the policy change reduces alcohol-related hospitalizations among teenagers and young adults by about 7-10%. (joint with Thomas Siedler)

    Referent/-in
    Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    Eleanor-Dulles-Raum DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 355
    22. April 2013

    SOEP Brown Bag Seminar Special: Endophilia or Exophobia: Beyond Discrimination

    The immense literature on discrimination treats outcomes as relativistic: One group suffers relative to another. But does a difference arise because agents discriminate against others-are exophobic-or because they favor their own kind-are endophiles? We conduct a field experiment in which graders at one university are randomly assigned students' exams that did or did not contain the students' names. Examining the effects of matches by nationality or gender on exam scores, on average we find favoritism but no discrimination by nationality, and neither favoritism nor discrimination by gender. Favoritism by nationality is due chiefly to behavior by the most experienced graders and those who had been rated as poor teachers in previous courses. We observe heterogeneity in both discrimination and favoritism by nationality and by gender in the distributions of graders' preferences. Although we could not perceive our own in-groups excepting as they contrast to out-groups, still the in-groups are psychologically primary. Hostility toward out-groups helps strengthen our sense of belonging, but it is not required. [Allport, 1954]

    Mehr Informationen
    Referent/-in
  • Dan Hamermesh, University of Texas at Austin and Royal Holloway University London (joint with Jan Feld and Nicolás Salamanca, ROA University of Maastricht)
  • Zeit
    10:00 - 11:00
    Ort
    Gustav-Schmoller-Raum DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 3.3.002A Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 376
    17. April 2013

    Cluster-Seminar Öffentliche Finanzen und Lebenslagen Do mothers adjust their labor supply in response to child-raising benefits in the pension system?

    Referent/-in
    Zeit
    12:30 - 13:30
    Ort
    Eleanor-Dulles-Raum DIW Berlin im Quartier 110 Raum 5.2.010 Mohrenstraße 58 10117 Berlin
    Ansprechpartner/-in
    im DIW Berlin
    Tel.: +49 30 89789 355
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