Publications of the Project: Economics of Climate Change: Coping with Shocks in Mongolia – Vulnerability, Assets and Migration (Shocks Mongolia)

11 results, from 1
DIW Economic Bulletin 12 / 2014

The Impact of Extreme Weather Events on Children’s Height: Evidence from Mongolia

Shocks experienced during early childhood can harm the long term growth of children. We examine the potential impact of extreme weather events on children’s height,taking the example of Mongolia, which is frequently plagued by extreme winters. Our focus is on the unusually harsh winter of 2009/10, which caused the deaths of over 10 million animals, approximately 23.9 percent of the country’s entire ...

2014| Valeria Groppo, Kati Krähnert
Diskussionspapiere 1759 / 2018

When Shocks Become Persistent: Household-Level Asset Growth in the Aftermath of an Extreme Weather Event

With the increasing frequency and intensity of extreme weather events due to climate change, assessing the potential long-term effects of these events for affected households is critically important. This study analyzes to what extent a one-off extreme weather event can have persistent effects on household-level asset growth. Our focus is on the effect of a once-in-50-year winter disaster on post-shock ...

2018| Katharina Lehmann-Uschner, Kati Krähnert
Diskussionspapiere 1537 / 2015

Food Intake and the Role of Food Self-Provisioning

This paper investigates the role of food self-provisioning for the intake of macro- and micronutrients of households in Mongolia. Our analysis is based on rich household survey data that collected food consumption through consumption diaries. We analyze nutritional outcomes within and across the three prevalent Mongolian livelihoods that derive food from different sources: urban wave employees, rural ...

2015| Katharina Lehmann-Uschner, Kati Krähnert
Diskussionspapiere 1534 / 2015

The Impact of Extreme Weather Events on Education

This paper analyzes the short- and long-term impact of extreme weather events on educational outcomes in Mongolia. Our focus is on two extremely severe winters that caused mass livestock mortality. We use household panel data with comprehensive retrospective information on households’ historic experience with weather shocks. Exposure to the weather shock significantly reduces the likelihood of being ...

2015| Valeria Groppo, Kati Krähnert
Diskussionspapiere 1515 / 2015

Does Index Insurance Help Households Recover from Disaster? Evidence from IBLI Mongolia

This paper investigates the impact of indemnity payments from index insurance on the asset recovery of households after a catastrophic weather disaster occurs. Our focus is on the Index-Based Livestock Insurance (IBLI) in Mongolia. We analyze the effect of IBLI indemnity payments after a once-in-50-year winter disaster struck Mongolia over 2009/10. The database for our analysis is three waves of a ...

2015| Veronika Bertram-Huemmer, Kati Kraehnert
Diskussionspapiere 1403 / 2014

Extreme Weather Events and Child Height: Evidence from Mongolia

We provide new evidence on the impact of one severe weather shock on child height in Mongolia. Our focus is on the extremely harsh winter – locally referred to as dzud – of 2009/10, which caused more than 23 percent of the national livestock to perish. This resulted in a food insecurity situation for many Mongolian households. Our analysis identifies causal effects by exploiting exogenous variation ...

2014| Valeria Groppo, Kati Schindler
DIW Roundup 65 / 2015

Health Consequences of Childhood and Adolescence Shocks: Is There a "Critical Period"?

Individual health is not only determined by genetic factors, but also by negative or positive events during the life course. For example, children exposed to natural disasters or violent conflicts are more likely to have poor health as adults. Positiveexternal factors, such as nutritional programs, will, instead, improve individual health in the long-term. In turn, health can directly affect education ...

2015| Valeria Groppo
Externe referierte Aufsätze

Does Index Insurance Help Households Recover from Disaster? Evidence from IBLI Mongolia

This article investigates the impact of indemnity payments from index insurance on the asset recovery of households following a catastrophic weather disaster. Our focus is on the Index-Based Livestock Insurance (IBLI) in Mongolia. We analyze the effect of IBLI indemnity payments after a once-in-50-year winter disaster struck Mongolia over the 2009/10 winter. The analysis is based on three waves of ...

In: American Journal of Agricultural Economics 100 (2018), 1, S. 145-171 | Veronika Bertram-Hümmer, Kati Krähnert
Externe referierte Aufsätze

Food Intake and the Role of Food Self-Provisioning

This article investigates the role of food self-provisioning for the intake of nutrients of households in Mongolia. We analyse nutritional outcomes within and across urban wage employees, rural households with small herds, and pastoralists with large herds. Food self-provisioning significantly affects dietary quality and quantity. Farming food crops improves the nutrient intake. In contrast, animal ...

In: Journal of Development Studies 53 (2017) 8, S. 1303–1322 | Katharina Lehmann-Uschner, Kati Krähnert
Externe referierte Aufsätze

The Impact of Extreme Weather Events on Education

This paper provides new evidence on the long- and medium-term impact of extreme weather events on education. Our focus is on Mongolia, where two extremely severe winters caused mass livestock mortality. We use household panel data with information on households' pre-shock location, combined with historic district-level livestock census data and climate data. Our econometric strategy exploits exogenous ...

In: Journal of Population Economics 30 (2017), 2, S. 433-472 | Valeria Groppo, Kati Krähnert
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