Farbzauber (Copyright)  Berlin Reichstag Bundestag
Economic Bulletin, 13 Sep 2017

Although many political authorities endorse the basic goal of parity between men and women across the board, reality does not yet reflect this in Germany. In the German Bundestag, for example, at present 37.1 percent of representatives are women. Divided among the six parties with the greatest ... more

puje (Copyright)  Statistik Diagramm Bilanz
Economic Bulletin, 08 Sep 2017

The German economy’s upswing is holding steady. The fine state of the world economy and robust domestic economic development are driving Germany’s GDP growth. After an unexpectedly strong first half of 2017, the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin) forecasts 1.9 percent ... more

Andreas Weber (Copyright)  Finanzmarkt Geldmarkt Kapitalmarkt
Economic Bulletin, 08 Sep 2017

This year and next, global GDP will grow more strongly than expected. The growth rate should be just under four percent. In developed economies, the continuing improvement in the job market situation will drive consumption. Corporate investment activity will also gain momentum. Over the forecast ... more

Bernd Kröger (Copyright)  Berlin Reichstagskuppel Farbbild
Economic Bulletin, 08 Sep 2017

The German economy is on track for continued growth. Due to the unexpectedly robust first six months of 2017, the German Institute for Economic Research is raising its forecast for GDP growth to 1.9 percent for the current year. This year and arguably for the coming two years, the country’s ... more

Funshooter (Copyright)  Mechaniker Techniker Handwerker
Economic Bulletin, 04 Sep 2017

In the last decade the available labor force has expanded in Germany—despite the decline in the working-age population. The reason: labor market participation has increased, for women in particular and older people in general. Also noticeable was a rise in qualification level because well ... more

List of news
by Daniela Arregui Coka, Ronny Freier, Johanna Mollerstrom, in DIW Economic Bulletin

Although many political authorities endorse the basic goal of parity between men and women across the board, reality does not yet reflect this in Germany. In the German Bundestag, for example, at present 37.1 percent of representatives are women. Divided among the six parties with the greatest likelihood of being elected to the Bundestag, a total of 1,979 people are running for office in the upcoming election. Of these, 35.7 percent are women. An analysis of the lists of candidates by party shows that the parties currently represented in the Bundestag have significantly higher proportions of women among their candidates than the opposition parties FDP and AfD do. In the top 48 slots—that is, the first three on each of the 16 state lists—the Green Party is putting forward 32 women, the Left Party 27, and the SPD 25. With 15 female candidates for office, the Union Parties (CDU/CSU) are also higher than the FDP and AfD (with 11 and eight candidates respectively). Of the 263 ministerial posts available since Germany was founded, women have only held 43. Although Germany has a female chancellor and the gender distribution in the current cabinet is almost equal, certain ministerial posts have yet to be held by a woman. The government resulting from the upcoming Bundestag election could serve as an example by explicitly committing itself to gender parity. In state parliaments, women are more underrepresented than on the national level. In the former, the proportion of women is 31 percent and has recently fallen. Only three out of 16 regional governments are headed by a woman. An international comparison shows that extended use of voluntary quotas for the parties—as already practiced in Germany—could be a highly viable way of achieving parity. They would be more effective if consistently implemented by all at all levels. And voters can make a difference by demanding equal representation from the parties.

by Ferdinand Fichtner, Guido Baldi, Karl Brenke, Marius Clemens, Christian Dreger, Hella Engerer, Marcel Fratzscher, Stefan Gebauer, Simon Junker, Claus Michelsen, Malte Rieth, Thore Schlaak, in DIW Economic Bulletin

by Ferdinand Fichtner, Guido Baldi, Christian Dreger, Hella Engerer, Stefan Gebauer, Malte Rieth, in DIW Economic Bulletin

This year and next, global GDP will grow more strongly than expected. The growth rate should be just under four percent. In developed economies, the continuing improvement in the job market situation will drive consumption. Corporate investment activity will also gain momentum. Over the forecast horizon, a slowly rising inflation rate and somewhat tighter monetary policy will gradually slow private consumption down. Emerging countries are able to maintain somewhat more robust growth. Production is expanding again in China. In Brazil and Russia, stabilizing prices of raw materials and decreasing inflation rates are supporting economic momentum. Uncertainty about the US government’s economic policy and the geopolitical conflict involving North Korea are current risks for the world economy.

List of Publications

Latest Tweets of DIW Berlin:

Profilbild
15.09.
Fact : poverty risk in Germany has increased strongly, also since 2005, esp. for single parents, is higher than in EU.
Profilbild
15.09.
Fact : the wage gap in Germany has increased strongly since 1995 (& less s. 2010), bottom 40% have lower real wages today.
Profilbild
15.09.
Fact : atypical employment in Germany has risen for people with low income, and has fallen for those with high income.
Profilbild
15.09.
Fact on in Germany: The middle class is shrinking, independent of narrow or wide definition.
Direct to
  • SOEP - The Socio-Economic Panel
  • DIW Berlin Graduate Center of Economic and Social Research
  • Society of Friends of DIW Berlin
  • Diw Econ
  • Berlin Economics Research Associates
  • Berlin Centre for Consumer Policies
  • Leibniz Association
  • audit berufundfamilie
  • Research Data Centres of the Federal Statistical Office and the statistical offices of the Länder