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387 results, from 321
  • DIW Weekly Report 40 / 2018

    Weather Index Insurance Can Help Households Recover from Extreme Weather Events

    Weather index insurance is considered a promising international climate policy instrument that can help households adapt better to climate change. This is especially true in developing countries where households often suffer severely from the consequences of extreme weather events. This report is one of the first to evaluate the impact of a globally recognized index insurance, Mongolia’s Index-Based ...

    2018| Kati Kraehnert, Veronika Bertram-Huemmer
  • DIW Weekly Report 40 / 2018

    Extreme Weather Events Drastically Reduce School Completion by Mongolian Children

    As climate change progresses, extreme weather events are occurring more often, with developing countries suffering the brunt. Using Mongolia as an example, this study examines how extremely cold and snowy winters—which lead to high livestock mortality and thus threaten the livelihood of many households—impact children’s school completion. The results, based on a representative household survey conducted ...

    2018| Kati Kraehnert, Valeria Groppo
  • DIW Weekly Report 40 / 2018

    Extremely Harsh Winters Threaten the Livelihood of Mongolia’s Herders

    Households in developing countries are exposed to increasingly extreme weather events that could endanger their prosperity. This study examines the impact of the unusually cold, snowy winter of 2009/2010 on the livestock of Mongolian households. Livestock represents on average more than 90 percent of the value of all assets owned. It is essential for current consumption and—due to the insufficient ...

    2018| Katharina Lehmann-Uschner, Kati Kraehnert
  • DIW Weekly Report 40 / 2018

    Consequences of Extreme Weather Events for Developing Countries Based on the Example of Mongolia: Editorial

    2018| Kati Kraehnert, Claudia Kemfert
  • DIW Weekly Report 40 / 2018

    Complete Issue

    2018
  • DIW Weekly Report 38/39 / 2018

    Policy Responses to Turkey’s Crisis: Independent Central Bank and International Credit

    The presently tenuous situation in Turkey will worsen if the government does not take appropriate policy action. In view of foreign investors’ loss of confidence, the cost of external financing is likely to rise while consumption and investment will fall, and the Turkish lira would depreciate further. The influx of foreign capital would dry up as well. Conservative estimates show that the country’s ...

    2018| Alexander Kriwoluzky, Malte Rieth
  • DIW Weekly Report 38/39 / 2018

    Complete Issue

    2018
  • DIW Weekly Report 37 / 2018

    Inequality of Earnings in Germany Generally Accepted but Low Incomes Considered Unfair

    Earnings differences are a recurring topic of public discussion in Germany. Data from the long-term Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) study as well as a separate survey of German employees (LINOS) show that earnings inequalities are generally perceived as fair while a substantial share of the respondents find the current earnings distribution in Germany unfair. This applies above all to the middle and lower ...

    2018| Jule Adriaans, Stefan Liebig
  • DIW Weekly Report 37 / 2018

    Complete Issue

    2018
  • DIW Weekly Report 36 / 2018

    German Economy Remaining Robust in Uncertain Times: DIW Economic Outlook

    The German economy will keep on growing amid risks although growth will slow down somewhat. GDP will continue to grow noticeably at 1.8 percent this year, 1.7 percent next year, and 1.8 percent in 2020. Private household incomes in particular—and thus consumption as well—are boosting growth, as the labor markets are improving: the unemployment rate will fall from 5.2 percent this year to well below ...

    2018| Claus Michelsen, Christian Breuer, Martin Bruns, Marius Clemens, Max Hanisch, Simon Junker, Thore Schlaak
  • DIW Weekly Report 36 / 2018

    The Global Economy and the Euro Area: So Far Trade Disputes Have Had Only Limited Effects on Global Growth: DIW Economic Outlook

    After a strong second quarter, the global upturn appears to remain intact, economic and political turmoils notwithstanding, especially in the United States and the euro area. Therefore, DIW Berlin is slightly raising its forecast for the global economy this year to 4.2 percent. Over the course of the rest of the year, however, non-recurring effects are likely to disappear in the United States, causing ...

    2018| Claus Michelsen, Guido Baldi, Geraldine Dany-Knedlik, Hella Engerer, Stefan Gebauer, Malte Rieth
  • DIW Weekly Report 36 / 2018

    German Economy Continues to Grow Moderately but Risks Remain: Editorial

    2018| Claus Michelsen, Guido Baldi, Christian Breuer, Martin Bruns, Marius Clemens, Geraldine Dany-Knedlik, Hella Engerer, Marcel Fratzscher, Stefan Gebauer, Max Hanisch, Simon Junker, Malte Rieth, Thore Schlaak
  • DIW Weekly Report 36 / 2018

    Complete Issue

    2018
  • DIW Weekly Report 34/35 / 2018

    Differences in Full-Time Work Experience Explain almost a Quarter of the Gender Pay Gap in Management Positions

    Women still earn less than men on average in Germany. This applies to management positions even more: between 2010 and 2016, there was an average gender pay gap of 30 percent in gross hourly earnings. If gender-specific differences in relevant wage determinants are excluded, a pay gap of 11 percent remains. With seven percentage points, full-time work experience explains the gender pay gap to almost ...

    2018| Elke Holst, Anne Marquardt
  • DIW Weekly Report 34/35 / 2018

    Complete Issue

    2018
  • DIW Weekly Report 33 / 2018

    Successful Climate Protection via Rapid Coal Phaseout in Germany and North Rhine-Westphalia

    Power generation from lignite and hard coal was responsible for more than a quarter of German greenhouse gas emissions in 2016. Of all federal states, North Rhine-Westphalia is by far the largest carbon emitter. The Growth, Structural Change and Regional Development Commission (also known as “Coal Commission”) among others are currently debating alternative pathways toward a coal phaseout to achieve ...

    2018| Leonard Göke, Martin Kittel, Claudia Kemfert, Casimir Lorenz, Pao-Yu Oei, Christian von Hirschhausen
  • DIW Weekly Report 33 / 2018

    Complete Issue

    2018
  • DIW Weekly Report 32 / 2018

    Diesel Fuel and Passenger Cars Receive Preferential Tax Treatment in Europe; Reform of Taxation Needed in Germany

    Duties and taxes on cars are an important source of revenue for European governments and the tax systems are also designed with the goal of achieving environmental policy objectives. A systematic and quantitative comparison of passenger car taxation in 30 European countries shows significant differences among them. However, in almost every country, the use of vehicles with diesel engines is taxed less ...

    2018| Uwe Kunert
  • DIW Weekly Report 32 / 2018

    Complete Issue

    2018
  • DIW Weekly Report 30/31 / 2018

    Signs of New Housing Bubble in Many OECD Countries – Lower Risk in Germany

    Ten years after the worldwide financial and economic crisis was triggered by the American real estate market, real estate prices are rising around the globe. Concerns about a new housing bubble are growing. The present report based on OECD data for 20 countries demonstrates that this concern is not unwarranted. In eight countries, including the United Kingdom and the USA, the evolution of real estate ...

    2018| Konstantin A. Kholodilin, Claus Michelsen
387 results, from 321
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