Publikationen des Projekts: Interactions between bank-specific risk and macroeconomic performance

15 Ergebnisse, ab 1
DIW Wochenbericht 13/14 / 2013

Marktkonzentration im Bankensektor kann makroökonomische Effekte haben

Die globale Finanz- und Wirtschaftskrise hat eine intensive Debatte über eine angemessene Regulierung des Banken- und Finanzsektors ausgelöst. Dabei wird insbesondere die Bedeutung von großen und stark vernetzten Banken für die gesamtwirtschaftliche Stabilität diskutiert. In diesem Beitrag wird der Frage nachgegangen, welche Implikationen die Präsenz von großen Banken für Schwankungen des The glob

2013| Franziska Bremus
Diskussionspapiere 1822 / 2019

The Nexus between Loan Portfolio Size and Volatility: Does Banking Regulation Matter?

Since the global financial crisis and the related restructuring of banking systems, bank concentration is on the rise in many countries. Consequently, bank size and its role for macroeconomic volatility (or: stability) is the subject of intense debate. This paper analyzes the effects of financial regulations on the link between bank size, as measured by the volume of the loan portfolio, and

2019| Franziska Bremus, Melina Ludolph
Diskussionspapiere 1636 / 2017

Bank-Specific Shocks and House Price Growth in the U.S.

This paper investigates the link between mortgage supply shocks at the banklevel and regional house price growth in the U.S. using micro-level data on mortgage markets from the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act for the 1990-2014 period. Our results suggest that bank-specific mortgage supply shocks indeed affect house price growth at the regional level. The larger the idiosyncratic shocks to newly

2017| Franziska Bremus, Thomas Krause, Felix Noth
Diskussionspapiere 1348 / 2013

Big Banks and Macroeconomic Outcomes: Theory and Cross-Country Evidence of Granularity

Does the mere presence of big banks affect macroeconomic outcomes? In this paper, we develop a theory of granularity (Gabaix, 2011) for the banking sector, introducing Bertrand competition and heterogeneous banks charging variable markups. Using this framework, we show conditions under which idiosyncratic shocks to bank lending can generate aggregate fluctuations in the credit supply when the

2013| Franziska Bremus, Claudia M. Buch, Katheryn N. Russ, Monika Schnitzer
Diskussionspapiere 1346 / 2013

Granularity in Banking and Growth: Does Financial Openness Matter?

We explore the impact of large banks and of financial openness for aggregate growth. Large banks matter because of granular effects: if markets are very concentrated in terms of the size distribution of banks, idiosyncratic shocks at the bank-level do not cancel out in the aggregate but can affect macroeconomic outcomes. Financial openness may affect GDP growth in and of itself, and it may also

2013| Franziska Bremus, Claudia M. Buch
Diskussionspapiere 1344 / 2013

Cross-Border Banking, Bank Market Structures and Market Power: Theory and Cross-Country Evidence

Patterns in cross-border banking have changed since the global financial crisis. This may affect domestic bank market structures and macroeconomic stability in the longer term. In this study, I theoretically and empirically analyze how different modes of cross-border banking impact bank concentration. I use a two- country general equilibrium model with heterogeneous banks developed by De Blas and

2013| Franziska Bremus
Externe referierte Aufsätze

Big Banks and Macroeconomic Outcomes: Theory and Cross‐Country Evidence of Granularity

Does the mere presence of big banks affect macroeconomic outcomes? We develop a theory of granularity for the banking sector by modeling heterogeneous banks charging variable markups. Using data for a large set of countries, we show that the banking sector is indeed “granular,” as the right tail of the bank size distribution follows a power law. We demonstrate empirically that the presence of big

In: Journal of Money, Credit and Banking 50 (2018), 8, S. 1785-1825 | Franziska Bremus, Claudia M. Buch, Katheryn N. Russ, Monika Schnitzer
Externe referierte Aufsätze

Granularity in Banking and Growth: Does Financial Openness Matter?

We explore the impact of large banks and of financial openness for aggregate growth. Large banks matter because of granular effects: if markets are very concentrated in terms of the size distribution of banks, idiosyncratic shocks at the bank-level do not cancel out in the aggregate but can affect macroeconomic outcomes. Financial openness may affect GDP growth in and of itself, and it may also

In: Journal of Banking & Finance 77 (2017), S. 300-316 | Franziska Bremus, Claudia M. Buch
Externe referierte Aufsätze

Banking Market Structure and Macroeconomic Stability: Are Low-Income Countries Special?

Does the structure of banking markets affect macroeconomic volatility and, if yes, is this link different in low-income countries? In this paper, we explore the channels through which the structure of banking markets affects macroeconomic volatility. Our research has three main findings. First, we study whether idiosyncratic volatility at the bank level can impact aggregate volatility. We find

In: Pacific Economic Review 20 (2015), 1, S. 73-100 | Franziska Bremus, Claudia M. Buch
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